Harvey Weinstein is being put under the spotlight for all the wrong reasons.

On October 5, the New York Times first went public with their investigation where several women came forward and claimed sexual misconduct allegations against the Hollywood producer.

According to the publication, Harvey reached at least eight settlements with various women over a span of nearly 30 years. Ultimately, Harvey released his own statement after the story broke.

"I came of age in the 60's and 70's, when all the rules about behavior and workplaces were different. That was the culture then," he explained. "I have since learned it's not an excuse, in the office—or out of it. To anyone. I realized some time ago that I needed to be a better person and my interactions with the people I work with have changed."

Harvey continued, "I appreciate the way I've behaved with colleagues in the past has caused a lot of pain, and I sincerely apologize for it. Though I'm trying to do better, I know I have a long way to go. That is my commitment."

Ronan Farrow then published an article in The New Yorker Tuesday in which three women accused Weinstein of rape. His rep said in response, "Any allegations of non-consensual sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein. Mr. Weinstein has further confirmed that there were never any acts of retaliation against any women for refusing his advances. Mr. Weinstein obviously can't speak to anonymous allegations, but with respect to any women who have made allegations on the record, Mr. Weinstein believes that all of these relationships were consensual. Mr. Weinstein has begun counseling, has listened to the community and is pursuing a better path. Mr. Weinstein is hoping that, if he makes enough progress, he will be given a second chance."

His lawyer has called the allegations in the initial New York Times article "false and defamatory" and claimed a lawsuit against the publication is being prepped.

As new allegations continue to be revealed, some of Hollywood's biggest stars are speaking out and sharing their own perspectives. Take a look at what some actors and actresses—who have and haven't worked with Harvey in the past—have to say.

Angelina Jolie, Harvey Weinstein

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Angelina Jolie"I had a bad experience with Harvey Weinstein in my youth, and as a result, chose never to work with him again and warn others when they did," she told The New York Times via email. "This behavior towards women in any field, any country is unacceptable."

Gwyneth Paltrow The actress told The New York Times that when she was 22, Weinstein hired her for the lead role in Emma and that before production began he invited her to his hotel suite, placed his hands on her and suggested they get massages. She said, "I was a kid...I was signed up. I was petrified." She said she refused his advances and told her then-boyfriend Brad Pitt, who confronted Weinstein and told him never to touch her again.

Cara Delevingne The model and actress said that she attended a meeting with Weinstein and a director in a hotel lobby and that she and Weinstein were later left alone, after which he invited her to his room. She said she declined initially but went there after his assistant said her car was not ready.

"When I arrived I was relieved to find another woman in his room and thought immediately that I was safe," she said in a statement posted on Instagram. "He asked us to kiss and she began some sort of advances upon his direction. I swiftly got up and asked him if he knew that I could sing. And I began to sing...I thought it would make the situation better...more professional...like an audition...I was so nervous. After singing I said again that I had to leave. He walked me to the door and stood in front of it and tried to kiss me on the lips. I stopped him and managed to get out of the room."

"I still got the part for the film and always thought that he gave it to me because of what happened," she continued. "Since then I felt awful that I did the movie. I felt like I didn't deserve the part. I was so hesitant about speaking out...I didn't want to hurt his family. I felt guilty as if I did something wrong. I was also terrified that this sort of thing had happened to so many women I know but no one had said anything because of fear. I want women and girls to know that being harassed or abused or raped is NEVER their fault and not talking about it will always cause more damage than speaking the truth."

Rose McGowan

Paul Archuleta/FilmMagic

Rose McGowan: Shortly after Harvey was fired from The Weinstein Company, Rose called on his board to resign. "I'm calling on the board to resign effective immediately," the actress told The Hollywood Reporter. "And for other men to stop other men when they are being disgusting. Men in Hollywood need to change ASAP. Hollywood's power is dying because society has changed and grown, and yet Hollywood male behavior has not. It is so not a good look. In the way cooler than Hollywood world I live and work in, I am actually embarrassed to be associated with it."

Ashley Judd: In the original New York Times story, Ashley was one alleged victim who shared her experience with Harvey. According to the actress, Harvey asked if he could give her a massage or she could watch him shower. "Women have been talking about Harvey amongst ourselves for a long time, and it's simply beyond time to have the conversation publicly," Ashley shared in the interview.

Asia Argento, Harvey Weinstein

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Asia Argento: The Italian actress and xXx star told Farrow in a New Yorker interview that when she was 21, he performed oral sex on her in a hotel room against her will. She said that over the years, he kept contacting her and she eventually yielded to his further advances and even had consensual sexual relations with him, because she felt "obliged" to, adding, "After the rape, he won."

Anthony Bourdain The Parts Unknown star and boyfriend of Argento tweeted, ".@AsiaArgento I am proud and honored to know you. You just did the hardest thing in the world."

He also responded to a tweet that read "DOZENS of prominent actors and producers gave 'no comment' after Weinstein bombshell," Bourdain replied, "Nauseating, chicken-hearted enablers all." He then clarified, "I'm not talking about his victims. I'm talking about everyone else who knew and said nothing. Who are still staying silent." He also added, "And to be clear: I'm talking about all the people who knew and said nothing -and those who are STILL staying silent . NOT his victims."

Bourdain then tweeted his support for McGowan, ".@rosemcgowan has been way out in front of this thing . Took a lot of courage."

Mark Ruffalo: "I just think we have to break out of our comfort zones if we want anything really to change," he told E! News' Zuri Hall at the premiere of Thor Ragnarock. "America's gotten so tribal that people are just protective of people doing really terrible stuff because they're part of your scene or they're part of your industry. Listen, it's just as wrong [when] the president does it as it is as Harvey Weinstein or any other person out there and the men gotta speak up for the women and the women gotta speak up for the men...we got to get out of our comfort zones, otherwise it's gonna stay the same."

"To be clear what Harvey Weinstein did was a disgusting abuse of power and horrible," the actor alleged on Twitter. "I hope we are now seeing the beginning of the end of these abuses." Jessica Chastain would later share the same tweet with an additional message that stated, "You are a wonderful human." 

Meryl Streep: Back at the 2012 Golden Globes, the actress jokingly referred to Harvey as "God." On Monday, however, the Oscar winner publicly distanced herself from the producer. "The disgraceful news about Harvey Weinstein has appalled those of us whose work he championed, and those whose good and worthy causes he supported. The intrepid women who raised their voices to expose this abuse are our heroes," Meryl said in a statement to E! News. "One thing can be clarified. Not everybody knew."

Grace Gummer (Streep's daughter): "The club of silence surrounding sexual harassment is disgusting," she tweeted. "It must be broken. Be loud. Be brave. We are all listening."

Terry Crews: "This whole thing with Harvey Weinstein is giving me PTSD. Why? Because this kind of thing happened to ME," he tweeted. "My wife n I were at a Hollywood function last year n a high level Hollywood executive came over 2 me and groped my privates...He called me the next day with an apology but never really explained why he did what he did. I decided not 2 take it further becuz I didn't want 2b ostracized— par 4 the course when the predator has power n influence. I let it go. And I understand why many women who this happens to let it go. Who's going 2 believe you? ( few) What r the repercussions?(many) Do u want 2 work again? (Yes) R you prepared 2b ostracized?"

Kate Winslet: "The fact that these women are starting to speak out about the gross misconduct of one of our most important and well regarded film producers, is incredibly brave and has been deeply shocking to hear. The way Harvey Weinstein has treated these vulnerable, talented young women is NOT the way women should ever EVER deem to be acceptable or commonplace in ANY workplace," the actress—who appeared in The Weinstein Company's The Reader—said in a statement to Variety. "I have no doubt that for these women this time has been, and continues to be extremely traumatic. I fully embrace and salute their profound courage, and I unequivocally support this level of very necessary exposure of someone who has behaved in reprehensible and disgusting ways. His behavior is without question disgraceful and appalling and very, very wrong. I had hoped that these kind of stories were just made up rumors, maybe we have all been naïve. And it makes me so angry. There must be ‘no tolerance' of this degrading, vile treatment of women in ANY workplace anywhere in the world."

Judi Dench: While the actress credits Harvey for helping her career in Hollywood, she couldn't help but show her support for the women coming forward with their experiences. "Whilst there is no doubt that Harvey Weinstein has helped and championed my film career for the past twenty years, I was completely unaware of these offences which are, of course, horrifying," Judi said in a statement, according to The Sun. "I offer my sympathy those who have suffered, and wholehearted support to those who have spoken out."

Lena Dunham: In a recent Twitter thread, the Girls star expressed her support for the women coming forward. "Anyone saying these women are weak for taking a settlement or waiting to come forward-you don't understand what intimidation means," she shared. "Men like Weinstein threaten what you hold dear- your safety, financial freedom and yes-career. Now is the time to listen and learn, not make ethical judgments about women who were intimidated, coerced and harmed."

Sunset Boulevard, Glenn Close

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Glenn Close"I'm sitting here, deeply upset, acknowledging to myself that, yes, for many years, I have been aware of the vague rumors that Harvey Weinstein had a pattern of behaving inappropriately around women. Harvey has always been decent to me, but now that the rumors are being substantiated, I feel angry and darkly sad," the actress shared in a statement to the New York Times. "I'm angry, not just at him and the conspiracy of silence around his actions, but also that the 'casting couch' phenomenon, so to speak, is still a reality in our business and in the world: the horrible pressure, the awful expectation put on a woman when a powerful, egotistical, entitled bully expects sexual favors in exchange for a job. Ours is an industry in which very few actors are indispensable and women are cast in far fewer roles than men, so the stakes are higher for women and make them more vulnerable to the manipulations of a predator. I applaud the monumental courage of the women who have spoken up. I hope that their stories and the reportage that gave them their voices represents a tipping point, that more stories will be told and that change will follow."

Brie Larson: Soon after the New York Times article was published, the actress spoke out on Twitter with her thoughts. "As always, I stand with the brave survivors of sexual assault and harassment," she wrote. "It's not your fault. I believe you."

America Ferrera: When sharing the original New York Times story on Twitter, America added her own message to her followers. "This abuse of power must be called out, however powerful the abuser," she wrote. "And we must publicly stand with those brave enough to come forward."

Christian Slater: "Women who come forward to speak out against abusers do so at great cost and risk to themselves and it's hard to believe that they are met with shaming statements, disbelief, and blame," the actor said in a lengthy statement on Twitter. "The brave actions of the women who went on the record and the journalists that shared their truth have powerfully challenged that paradigm. No woman should fear for her safety in the workplace. No man should feel immune from the consequences of his actions." 

Julianne Moore, 2016 Oscars, Academy Awards, Accessories

Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

Amber Tamblyn: When sharing an article calling on Harvey to release women from NDAs so they can tell their stories, Amber added: "Mr. Weinstein, I would have the upmost respect for you if you did this. The beginning of all healing is the truth. Let them speak." As for those being critical of the women who waited to come forward, the actress had a message. "Please stop holding actresses and women accountable for these silences and shaming them for not coming forward immediately. Stop," she explained.

Julianne Moore: "Coming forward about sexual abuse and coercion is scary and women have nothing to be gained personally by doing so," Julianne wrote to her Twitter followers Monday morning before giving credit to the women who shared their stories in the New York Times. "But through their bravery we move forward as a culture, and I thank them. Stand with @AshleyJudd @rosemcgowan and others.

George Clooney, Golden Globes

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George Clooney: "It's indefensible. That's the only word you can start with," the Oscar winner said in a statement to The Daily Beast. "Harvey's admitted to it, and it's indefensible. I've known Harvey for twenty years. He gave me my first big break as an actor in films on From Dusk till Dawn, he gave me my first big break as a director with Confessions of a Dangerous Mind. We've had dinners, we've been on location together, we've had arguments. But I can tell you that I've never seen any of this behavior—ever."

Judd Apatow: When sharing a New York Times follow-up article on Harvey, Judd shared his thoughts on the legal scandal. "What Harvey Weinstein did was abhorrent. He admits he did it," the director stated. "Why should anyone be silent in their disgust and support for his victims?" 

Jessica Chastain: "I was warned from the beginning. The stories were everywhere. To deny that is to create an environment for it to happen again," Jessica shared with her Twitter followers after sharing numerous articles about the Harvey case. And when one follower questioned why she worked with him in Eleanor Rigby, she responded: "Because the director wanted him, even after I spoke against it."

Jesse Tyler Ferguson: While sharing Ruffalo's Tweet about Harvey, the Modern Family star added his own remarks to the conversation. "My heart breaks for everyone who was hurt by this man," Jesse wrote. "As a actor, a human & a feminist I am standing in support. Always have. Always will." 

Olivia Wilde: "1. Let's be clear. What Harvey Weinstein did to those women was nothing short of abuse. I am disturbed, and disgusted. It's appalling. 2. Though I never witnessed it, I stand in solidarity with his victims, and hope their bravery sends a loud message to all abusers of power," Olivia shared in a Twitter thread. "3. The victim blaming needs to stop. As does the shaming of women who didn't come forward earlier. They spoke, and we are here to listen." 

Connie Britton: "I'm really proud of and impressed with the women who have come out and spoken out about it," Connie told E! News exclusively at the SMILF premiere Monday. "But I have to say I'm also…I'm glad that Harvey is taking some time to really look at this from a therapeutic standpoint and…I'm glad he's making that choice. I hope that as a very…as a pretty prominent figure in the culture that that will be an example to people and maybe start to change the culture."

Stephen Colbert The Late Show host talked about Harvey on Monday's show. "Speaking of something you never noticed that was there all along...famed Hollywood producer and human Shrek Harvey Weinstein is a bad person." He then went on to say that this is "monstrous behavior that in a just world would not be allowed to go on for decades." He added, "It is indefensible."

Jennifer Lawrence: The actress told E! News in a statement Tuesday, "I was deeply disturbed to hear the news about Harvey Weinstein's behavior. I worked with Harvey five years ago and I did not experience any form of harassment personally, nor did I know about any of these allegations. This kind of abuse is inexcusable and absolutely upsetting. My heart goes out to all of the women affected by these gross actions. And I want to thank them for their bravery to come forward.

Mindy Kaling: Mindy wrote on Twitter Monday, "There is no incentive for women in Hollywood to come forward to tell lies of a powerful producer sexually harassing them. I believe them." She then wrote, "Why is it helpful men speak up? Bc that's what this personality fears most: the disintegration of the tacit male support for this behavior."

Paul Feig: Paul tweeted Monday, "There is no excuse for monsters like Harvey Weinstein. It's up to all of us, men and women, to speak up against sexual harassment and abuse."

Jimmy Kimmel: The Jimmy Kimmel Live host responded to Donald Trump Jr.'s question over the weekend asking his thoughts on Harvey Weinstein. "You mean that big story from the failing, liberal, one-sided @nytimes? I think it is disgusting." He also discussed Weinstein on Monday's show sharing a joke about the movie producer as he had promised. "What's the difference between Harvey Weinstein and the Pillsbury Doughboy? When the Pillsbury Doughboy offers you a roll, he doesn't ask you to watch him take a shower for it."

Seth Meyers: Seth had three female Late Night With Seth Meyers writers respond to the Weinstein's apology. "It was revealed that famous Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein has been sexually harassing women and paying them to keep quiet about it," Meyers said on Monday's show. "And as stunning as the allegations are, equally stunning was the apology that Weinstein issued after the article was published. Here to comment are three of our writers Amber, Allie and Jenny everyone." Watch the video above to see their response.

Lin-Manuel Miranda The actor wrote on Twitter Tuesday, "I'm as appalled and repulsed by the Weinstein news as anyone with a beating heart. And forever in awe of the bravery of those who spoke out."

Ben Affleck: Ben wrote on his Facebook page Tuesday, "I am saddened and angry that a man who I worked with used his position of power to intimidate, sexually harass and manipulate many women over decades. The additional allegations of assault that I read this morning made me sick. This is completely unacceptable, and I find myself asking what I can do to make sure this doesn't happen to others. We need to do better at protecting our sisters, friends, co-workers and daughters. We must support those who come forward, condemn this type of behavior when we see it and help ensure there are more women in positions of power."

A person on Twitter then recalled the time he groped Hilarie Burton on TRL.

"I didn't forget," she tweeted. "Seriously, thank you for that. I was a kid."

Affleck then apologized to the actress.

"I acted inappropriately toward Ms. Burton and I sincerely apologize," he tweeted.

Matt Damon "Look, even before I was famous, I didn't abide this kind of behavior," he told Deadline. "But now, as the father of four daughters, this is the kind of sexual predation that keeps me up at night. This is the great fear for all of us...We know this stuff goes on in the world. I did five or six movies with Harvey. I never saw this. I think a lot of actors have come out and said, everybody's saying we all knew. That's not true. This type of predation happens behind closed doors, and out of public view. If there was ever an event that I was at and Harvey was doing this kind of thing and I didn't see it, then I am so deeply sorry, because I would have stopped it."

"And I will peel my eyes back now, father than I ever have, to look for this type of behavior," he said. "Because we know that it happens. I feel horrible for these women and it's wonderful they have this incredible courage and are standing up now. We can all feel this change that's happening, which is necessary and overdue. Men are a huge part of that change, and we have to be vigilant and we have to help protect and call this stuff out because we have our sisters and our daughters and our mothers. This kind of stuff can't happen. This morning, I just feel absolutely sick to my stomach."

Damon also denied a report that claimed he had tried to "kill" a story about Weinstein's behavior when media personality Sharon Waxman investigated it 13 years ago.

"For the record, I would never, ever, ever try to kill a story like that," he said. "I just wouldn't do that. It's not something I would do, for anybody."

Emma Watson: The actress wrote on Twitter Tuesday, "I stand with all the women who have been sexually harassed, and am awestruck by their bravery. This mistreatment of women has to stop." She continued, "In this instance it was women affected but I also stand with all the men, indeed any person, who has suffered sexual harassment."

Rosie O'Donnell: Rosie spoke to E! News on the red carpet at the SMILF premiere Monday. "Well you know I'm 55 he's 65, he became very famous at the same time my show was hitting. So I knew him and I knew of him and these stories were not a surprise to me." See more of Rosie's comments in the video above.

Nicole Kidman: The actress said in a statement to E! News Tuesday, "As I've stated before publicly, I support and applaud all women and these women who speak out against any abuse and misuse of power -- be it domestic violence or sexual harassment in the workforce. We need to eradicate this behavior."

Hillary Clinton: A statement from Hillary posted on Twitter Tuesday read, "I was shocked and appalled by the revelations about Harvey Weinstein. The behavior described by women coming forward cannot be tolerated. Their courage and support of others is critical in helping to stop this kind of behavior."

Chloe Grace Moretz: Chloe wrote on Instagram Tuesday, "The women who have spoken up against one of the most powerful men in our industry are heroes for all women going forward. I stand with them and am sickened by the crimes he committed, I push for a safer workplace for all women."

Gretchen Mol: "I am angry and disgusted about Harvey Weinstein's abuse of power and his shameless assaults against women. This kind of abuse of women is grossly familiar, and for many of us, it's hard to muster up surprise," the actress wrote in a guest column for The Hollywood Reporter. "I feel deeply for the women who had to deal with and navigate his incredibly entitled, bullying, revolting and inexcusable behavior. I am grateful to them and applaud their bravery in speaking out."

Viola Davis, The Rape Foundation

Photo by Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images for The Rape Foundation

Benedict Cumberbatch: "I am utterly disgusted by the continuing revelations of Harvey Weinstein's horrifying and unforgivable actions," the actor said in a statement obtained by The Hollywood Reporter. "We need to collectively stand up and support victims of abuse such as the brave and inspiring women who have spoken out against him and say we hear you and believe you. That way others may be emboldened by our support to come forward and speak. But we shouldn't wait until there are any more stories like this. We, as an industry and as a society at large need to play our part. There has to be zero tolerance of any such behavior in any walk of life. We owe that to these women's bravery in coming forward."

Viola Davis: "The predator wants your silence. It feeds their power, entitlement AND they want it to feed your shame. Our bodies are not the ‘spoils of war'… a trophy to be collected to fuel your ego," the How to Get Away With Murder star said in a statement to Variety. "It's OURS!!! It doesn't belong to you!! And when you take it without permission, it DESTROYS…… like a virus!!! To the predators.. Weinstein, the stranger, the relative, the boyfriend…. I say to you, ‘You can choose your sin but you don't get to choose the consequences.' To the victims…. I see you. I believe you… and I'm listening." 

Barack & Michelle Obama: "Michelle and I have been disgusted by the recent reports about Harvey Weinstein. Any man who demeans and degrades women in such fashion needs to be condemned and held accountable, regardless if wealth or status," the former President said in a statement. "We should celebrate the courage of women who have come forward to tell these painful stories. And we all need to build a culture—including empowering out girls and teaching our boys decency and respect—so we can make such behavior less prevalent in the future."

Charlize Theron, Today

Today

Charlize Theron: "The women who have spoken about their abuse are brave and heroic and although I didn't have a personal experience like this with Harvey Weinstein, I unfortunately cannot say I'm surprised," she wrote on Instagram. "This culture has always existed, not just in Hollywood but across the world. And many men in positions of power have gotten away with it for far too long. We cannot blame the victims here. A lot of these women are young, and just starting out in their respective fields, and have absolutely no way to stand up to a man with so much influence, much greater than theirs. If they speak up, they are shut down, and that could be the end of their career. This is all a positive step forward in changing that culture, and these young women need to know that they have a support system should anything like this happen to them. And I want you all to know I support you." 

Leonardo DiCaprio: "There is no excuse for sexual harassment or sexual assault-no matter who you are and no matter what profession," the actor shared on Twitter. "I applaud the strength and courage of woman who came forward and made their voices heard."

Minnie Driver: "In light of the revelations about Harvey Weinstein in the past few days, I feel it necessary to add my support for the women who have been victimized and have been brave enough to talk about it," the Good Will Hunting star said in a statement to Variety. "While I never experienced any abuse while working with Harvey, I think it's important to add my voice to those of women everywhere who have experienced abuse at the hands of powerful men."

Alyssa Milano "While I am sickened and angered over the disturbing accusations of Weinstein's sexual predation and abuse of power, I'm happy - ecstatic even - that it has opened up a dialogue around the continued sexual harassment, objectification and degradation of women," she wrote on patriotnotpartisan.com. "To the women who have suffered any form of abuse of power, I stand beside you. To the women who have come forward against a system that is designed to keep you silent, I stand in awe of you and appreciate you and your fortitude. It is not easy to disclose such experiences, especially in the public eye. Your strength will inspire others. Thank you, thank you, thank you, for fighting this battle so hopefully my daughter won't have to."

Sophia Bush "F--k yes to all the women speaking up. In every business vertical. In all systems that oppress them. Change is coming. F--k. Yes," she tweeted.

Heather Graham: "My hope is that this moment starts a dialogue on redefining sexual harassment in the workplace and empowers women to speak out when they feel uncomfortable in a situation. I hope that dialogue covers the gray areas where we ask ourselves, 'Did what I think happen just happen?' and that we are no longer shamed into feeling that we should grow a thicker skin, or that our story 'isn't good enough to count.' I'm glad the victims are being heard, that powerful voices in the industry are speaking up to say this kind of behavior isn't acceptable anymore, and that a predator is finally facing the consequences — it means the world is starting to change for the better," the actress wrote in a Variety piece. "While I still do feel guilty for not speaking up all those years ago, I'm glad for this moment of reckoning. To the countless other women who have experienced the gray areas: I believe you." 

British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA): The group suspended Weinstein's membership amid the allegations, saying in a statement, "Whilst BAFTA has previously been a beneficiary of Mr. Weinstein's support for its charitable work, it considers the reported alleged behavior completely unacceptable and incompatible with BAFTA's values. This has led to Mr. Weinstein's suspension, and it will be followed by a formal process as laid out in BAFTA's constitution. We hope this announcement sends a clear message that such behavior has absolutely no place in our industry. BAFTA will continue to work with the film, games and television industries to improve access to rewarding and fulfilling careers in safe, professional working environments."

The Sundance Institute and Film Festival: "The Sundance Institute and Film Festival denounce, in the strongest possible terms, the behavior of Harvey Weinstein as described by the growing number of women who have bravely come forward," the group said in a statement on  Twitter. "The accusations are abhorrent and profoundly disturbing. We recognize that too often a pattern of abuse like this one thrives in the shadows and we stand in solidarity with the courageous women whose honesty has helped shine a light on it."

I was called to meet Harvey Weinstein at the Savoy Hotel when I was 17. I assumed it would be in a conference room which was very common.When I arrived ,reception told me to go to his room . He opened the door in his bathrobe . I was incredibly naive and young and it did not cross my mind that this older ,unattractive man would expect me to have any sexual interest in him .After declining alcohol and announcing that I had school in the morning I left ,uneasy but unscathed.A few years later he asked me if he had tried anything with me in that first meeting .I realized he couldn't remember if he had assaulted me or not .I had what I thought were boundaries - I said no to him professionally many times over the years-some of which ended up with him screaming at me calling me a cunt and making threats, some of which made him laughingly tell people oh "Kate lives to say no to me ." It speaks to the status quo in this business that I was aware that standing up for myself and saying no to things,while it did allow me to feel uncompromised in myself,undoubtedly harmed my career and was never something I felt supported by anyone other than my family.I would like to applaud the women who have come forward , and to pledge that we can from this create a new paradigm where producers,managers,executives and assistants and everyone who has in the past shrugged and said " well, that's just Harvey /Mr X/insert name here " will realize that we in numbers can affect real change.For every moment like this there have been thousands where a vulnerable person has confided outrageous unprofessional behavior and found they have no recourse, due to an atmosphere of fear that it seems almost everyone has been living in .I had a male friend who, based on my experience,warned a young actress who said she was going to dinner with Harvey to be careful. He received a phone call the next day saying he would never work in another Miramax film ;the girl was already sleeping with Harvey and had told him that my friend had warned her off.Let's stop allowing our young women to be sexual cannon fodder,and let's remember that Harvey is an emblem of a system that is sick,and that we have work to do.

A post shared by Kate Beckinsale (@katebeckinsale) on

Kate Beckinsale: The actress wrote to her Instagram followers Thursday, "I was called to meet Harvey Weinstein at the Savoy Hotel when I was 17. I assumed it would be in a conference room which was very common.When I arrived ,reception told me to go to his room . He opened the door in his bathrobe . I was incredibly naive and young and it did not cross my mind that this older ,unattractive man would expect me to have any sexual interest in him .After declining alcohol and announcing that I had school in the morning I left ,uneasy but unscathed.A few years later he asked me if he had tried anything with me in that first meeting .I realized he couldn't remember if he had assaulted me or not .I had what I thought were boundaries - I said no to him professionally many times over the years-some of which ended up with him screaming at me calling me a cunt and making threats, some of which made him laughingly tell people oh "Kate lives to say no to me ." It speaks to the status quo in this business that I was aware that standing up for myself and saying no to things,while it did allow me to feel uncompromised in myself,undoubtedly harmed my career and was never something I felt supported by anyone other than my family.I would like to applaud the women who have come forward , and to pledge that we can from this create a new paradigm where producers,managers,executives and assistants and everyone who has in the past shrugged and said " well, that's just Harvey /Mr X/insert name here " will realize that we in numbers can affect real change.For every moment like this there have been thousands where a vulnerable person has confided outrageous unprofessional behavior and found they have no recourse, due to an atmosphere of fear that it seems almost everyone has been living in .I had a male friend who, based on my experience,warned a young actress who said she was going to dinner with Harvey to be careful. He received a phone call the next day saying he would never work in another Miramax film ;the girl was already sleeping with Harvey and had told him that my friend had warned her off.Let's stop allowing our young women to be sexual cannon fodder,and let's remember that Harvey is an emblem of a system that is sick,and that we have work to do."

Jane Fonda: Jane told CNN's Christiane Amanpour "I found out about Harvey about a year ago and I'm ashamed I didn't say anything right then. I was not that bold because I guess it hadn't happened to me and so I didn't feel it was my place."

Blake Livey: Blake said during an interview with THR, "That was never my experience with Harvey in any way whatsoever, and I think that if people heard these stories…I do believe in humanity enough to think that this wouldn't have just continued. I never heard any stories like this — I never heard anything specific — but it's devastating to hear." She continued, "The number one thing that can happen is that people who share their stories, people have to listen to them and trust them, and people have to take it seriously. As important as it is to remain furious about this, it's important to also say that this exists everywhere so remember to look everywhere. This isn't a single incident. This cannot happen, this should not happen, and it happens in every single industry."

She went on to add, "It's important that women are furious right now. It's important that there is an uprising. It's important that we don't stand for this and that we don't focus on one or two or three or four stories, it's important that we focus on humanity in general and say, 'This is unacceptable.'"

Ryan Gosling: Ryan tweeted Thursday, "I want to add my voice of support for the women who have had the courage to speak out against Harvey Weinstein. Like most people in Hollywood, I have worked with him and I'm deeply disappointed in myself for being so oblivious to these devastating experiences of sexual harassment and abuse. He is emblematic of a systemic problem. Men should stand with women and work together until there is real accountability and change."

Claire Forlani: Claire posted on Twitter Thursday, "Was approached by Ronan Farrow for the article he wrote on Harvey Weinstein. He didn't mention that it was about Harvey but when I received the email I instinctively knew it was going to be. I told some close men around me and they all advised me not to speak. I had already told Ronan I would speak with him but from the advice around me, interestingly the male advice around me, I didn't make the call. Today I sit here feeling some shame, like I'm not a woman supporting other women. I just read Mira Sorvino's article in Time and she writes of how scared she was to speak out and participate. I take little solace in that."

She continued, "You see, nothing happened to me with Harvey — by that I mean, I escaped 5 times. I had two Peninsula Hotel meetings in the evening with Harvey and all I remember was I ducked, dived and ultimately got out of there without getting slobbered over, well just a bit. Yes, massage was suggested. The three dinners with Harvey I don't really remember the time period, I was 25. I remember him telling me all the actresses who had slept with him and what he had done for them. I wasn't drinking the cool aid [sic], I knew Harvey was a master manipulator. He also announced to me at the last dinner I had with him at Dominic's that his pilot knew to be on standby because he could never get me to sleep with him, to which I did what I always did, make light of the situation, a joke here or there and moved on. You see, I always thought I was a pro at handling these guys, I'd had a fair amount of experience. Sometimes I got angry, really angry. I wondered why I had Prey stamped on my forehead but this I kept to myself."

Florence Darel: Florence told People that Harvey allegedly "propositioned her in a hotel room" while his first wife Eve Chilton was in the next room. "I was in shock. I was in shock. I was astonished. When you have someone so physically disgusting in front of you, continuing and continuing as though this was all perfectly normal… What happened to me may not be illegal but it was inappropriate. Very inappropriate," she told the publication.

Julia Roberts: The actress told People Thursday, "A corrupt, powerful man wields his influence to abuse and manipulate women. We've heard this infuriating, heartbreaking story countless times before. And now here we go again. I stand firm in the hope that we will finally come together as a society to stand up against this kind of predatory behavior, to help victims find their voices and their healing, and to stop it once and for all."

She continued, "If you've been subjected to any kind of abuse or harassment, there are places to go for help, including the Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network (RAINN.org). Or call the National Sexual Assault Hotline 800-656-HOPE (4673)."

Emma Thompson: Emma told BBC Newsnight, "I didn't know about these things, but they don't surprise me at all and they're endemic to the system anyway. What I find sort of extraordinary is that this man is at the top of a very particular iceberg. He's…I don't think you can describe him as a 'sex addict.' He's a predator. But what he's, as it were, the top of the ladder of is a system of harassment and belittling and bullying and interference and what my mother would have referred to in the olden days as ‘pestering.'

The actress continued, "'Is he pestering you?' That's the word we used to use in the olden days, if you recall. This has been part of our world, women's world, since time immemorial. So what we need to start talking about is the crisis in masculinity, the crisis of extreme masculinity, which is this sort of behavior and the fact that this is not only OK, but it also is represented by the most powerful man in the world at the moment."

Heidi Klum: Heidi told People Thursday, "I wish I could say that the horrible stories I read about Harvey Weinstein are a rare occurrence in our society, but that is simply not the case. We would be naive to think that this behavior only happens in Hollywood. This is one example of the more pervasive problem of the mistreatment of women around the world. I think it would be hard to find a woman – myself included – who have not had an experience where they have felt intimidated or threatened by a man using his power, position or his physical stature. I truly admire these brave women who are coming forward to share their stories because change cannot come unless there is a dialogue and people are held accountable."

Mariska Hargitay: Mariska tweeted Friday, "To all brave survivors who used their voices this week to shine a light on sexual harassment and violence in the entertainment industry—and to those who feel they have no voice: I stand with you, now and always. #SupportSurvivors."

Minka Kelly: Minka wrote on Instagram Friday, "I met Harvey at an industry party. The following day, my agent said he wanted to see me for a general meeting. The location was set for his hotel room. I wasn't comfortable with going to his room & said so. The following day, we sat down with an assistant in the hotel restaurant. He bulls--t me for 5 minutes re: movies he could put me in, then asked the assistant to excuse us. As she walked away, he said, "I know you were feeling what I was feeling when we met the other night" and then regaled me with offers of a lavish life filled with trips around the world on private planes etc. IF I would be his girlfriend. Or, "We could just keep this professional." All I knew was not to offend this very powerful man and to get out of the situation as quickly as possible. I told him while flattered, I'd like to keep things professional. He said "Fine. I trust you won't tell anyone about this." I said "Of course not. Thank you so much for taking the time to meet with me," - the only way I could think to shut it down gracefully and excuse myself." 

 

She continued, "I immediately told my agent what happened. We marveled at his audacity, reinforced my instinct not to offend him & laughed at how glad I was to get out of there. Neither of us were that surprised as this wasn't far off from the day-to-day bulls--t of being an actress. I'm sorry for obliging his orders to be complicit in protecting his behavior, which he obviously knew was wrong or he wouldn't have asked me not to tell anyone in the first place. For making him feel ok about the gross things he was saying and that I felt my only route was to say I was flattered. For not insisting that my reps never allow anyone to take a meeting in a hotel room (with him or anyone else), because I honestly don't know what might have happened if I'd just showed up as originally scheduled. 
Minka ended her message with, "I am appalled for all the women being told these occurrences are in any way their fault. No more Harvey Weinstein in Hollywood does not solve the problem but maybe the more voices sharing their stories and adding support to the countless women and men who have suffered through abuse of power, the less it will be tolerated."

Angie Everhart: Angie shared allegations of an encounter with Weinstein at the Venice Film Festival on the Frosty, Heidi & Frank radio show. "I had just arrived and I was sleeping, I was in my bed...I wake up and Harvey is standing above my bed. Now that alone is frightening. All of the sudden he takes his pants down and starts doing his stuff. He's blocking the door. I can't get out and he...I don't know how to say this on the radio, but he finishes on the carpet of the floor."

She continued, "And then he said, 'You're a really nice girl, you shouldn't tell anybody about this.' I told everybody on the boat but nobody did anything about it. Nobody wanted to do anything about it because everyone was terrified of Harvey."

(Originally published Monday October 9, 2017 at  4:51 p.m. PST)

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