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DiGiorno, Twitter

Twitter

This is just another cautionary tale for any companies on Twitter. Always, always think before you tweet.

DiGiorno Pizza's account got involved with a trending topic on Twitter last night, which is not out of the ordinary for companies trying to promote their brand online. Unfortnately, the Twitter campaign they decided to jump on was one dedicated to domestic abuse victims sharing their heartbreaking and inspiring stories using the #WhyIStayed and #WhyILeft hashtags.

Obviously, the person operating the account did not know the story behind the hashtag or else they never would have sent out this now deleted tweet that read: "#WhyIStayed You Had Pizza."

DiGiorno, Twitter

Twitter

Twitter users, specifically those who were bravely sharing their own stories of domestic violence, were outraged at DiGiorno for their insensitive tweet and terrible timing. The company immediately took down the tweet and apologized for their mistake:

Since the incident, the company has been sending individual tweets to those who were offended by their original #WhyIStayed tweet:

A rep for DiGiorno tells E! News in a statement regarding the tweet:

"This tweet was a mistake, quickly realized as such and deleted seconds later. Our community manager—and the entire DiGiorno team—is truly sorry. The tweet does not reflect our values and we've been personally responding to everyone who has engaged with us on social media. We apologize."

The #WhyIStayed and #WhyILeft campaign on Twitter is meant to be an open and honest conversation about domestic violence and the women who were involved in an abusive relationship and the women who are still experiencing it. It started after a video of NFL star Ray Rice punching his wife in the face in an elevator leaked online. Rice has since been dropped from the Baltimore Ravens and suspended indefinitely from the NFL.

For more information on domestic abuse or to get help for yourself or someone you love, visit the website for The National Domestic Violence Hotline or call 1-800-799-7233.