Meghan Markle, Remembrance Day Service

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Meghan Markle's father, Thomas Markle, could testify against her in her legal battle with the Mail on Sunday.

According to The Telegraph, citing court documents filed at the High Court on Tuesday, the Duchess of Sussex's dad could present "evidence" that would serve as part of the Mail of Sunday's defense against the royal.

"If he is called, he will come," Samantha Markle, Meghan's estranged half-sister, told the BBC.

Back in October, news broke that Meghan is taking legal action against the Mail on Sunday and its parent company Associated Newspaper over the allegation the outlet unlawfully published her private letter. According to Sky News, the lawsuit accuses the Mail on Sunday of misuse of private information, infringement of copyright and breach of the Data Protection Act of 2018. 

"We have initiated legal proceedings against the Mail on Sunday, and its parent company Associated Newspapers, over the intrusive and unlawful publication of a private letter written by the Duchess of Sussex, which is part of a campaign by this media group to publish false and deliberately derogatory stories about her, as well as her husband," a spokesperson from Schillings, which represents Meghan, said via a statement in October. "Given the refusal of Associated Newspapers to resolve this issue satisfactorily, we have issued proceedings to redress this breach of privacy, infringement of copyright and the aforementioned media agenda."

The Telegraph reported the aforementioned court documents disclosed text messages sent from Thomas to Meghan ahead of her wedding to Prince Harry. According to the publication, the documents claim the last text Thomas received was on May 17 "admonishing him for talking to the press, telling him to stop and accusing him of causing hurt to his daughter." Per the report, citing the documents, it was signed "Love M and H." The Telegraph also reported the defense alleged Harry and Meghan "did not ask how [Thomas] was or how [his] surgery had gone."

E! News has not seen the documents reportedly obtained by The Telegraph.

The Mail on Sunday has stood by the publication of its story. 

"The Mail on Sunday stands by the story it published and will be defending this case vigorously," a spokesperson for the publication said in a statement back in October. It also denied claims that the "Duchess' letter was edited in any way that changed its meaning."

In October, Thomas told the newspaper he felt the need "to release parts of the letter" to "defend" himself after reading a February 2019 article in People. According to the Associated Press, via USA Today, The Mail on Sunday claimed in the court documents that the letter had already been mentioned in an article published by People, in which unnamed "friends" of Meghan defended her against the alleged "global bullying" she faced.

"Thomas Markle had a weighty right to tell his version of what had happened between himself and his daughter including the contents of the Letter," the Mail on Sunday's defense said, per The New York Times.

In addition, the Mail on Sunday reportedly alleged in the documents that Meghan "anticipated [the letter] being disclosed to and read by third parties." It also claimed the royal family members "generate and rely on publicity about themselves and their lives in order to maintain the privileged positions they hold and to promote themselves, their fulfillment of their duties and functions, and the good causes they have espoused.″ 

It's certainly been a busy time for the royal family. Last week, Harry and Meghan announced they were stepping back as "senior" royals and splitting their time between the U.K. and North America.

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