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Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Kate Middleton

Chris Jackson - WPA Pool/Getty Images

Kate Middleton is putting pen to paper fingers to keyboard all in the name of children's mental health. 

The 34-year-old Duchess of Cambridge announced Wednesday that she would be assuming a very different title at Kensington Palace for the day—guest editor. In a blog post published on the Huffington Post's website, she introduced the digital world to a brand new charitable venture close to her heart. 

"Young Minds Matter, being launched today, is a new series where issues and work around the mental health of young children will be explored," the British beauty penned. "The mental health of our children must be seen as every bit as important as their physical health."

Middleton was first introduced to the issues surrounding mental health as a newlywed involved in various charities. She soon learned that many of the battles adults faced stemmed from "childhood challenges" that remained unresolved because of embarrassment and shame.

As the mother of newborn Princess Charlotte and 2-year-old toddler Prince George, Kate couldn't help but put herself in the shoes of parents who are desperate to aide their children, but fear the societal consequences or lack the financial support.

"Like most parents today, William and I would not hesitate to seek help for our children if they needed it. We hope to encourage George and Charlotte to speak about their feelings, and to give them the tools and sensitivity to be supportive peers to their friends as they get older," she wrote. "We know there is no shame in a young child struggling with their emotions or suffering from a mental illness."

Prince William, Kate Middleton, Prince George, Princess Charlotte

Chris Jelf

In order to ease the logistical burdens seeking treatment may pose to underprivileged families, the Duchess issued a call for help to children's closest institutions. 

"We need schools and communities to play their full role to help children who are struggling in ways that are not always easy to see," she plead. 

As an integral part of the royal's message, the digital initiative will feature articles from all types of people affected by mental illness to "lead the conversation" about causes and solutions and ultimately "make a real difference for an entire generation of young children."

This announcement falls a week after Middleton first appealed to children in a video released during Children's Mental Health Week 2016 in the United Kingdom.

Seated at a table of children, she spoke of the treatment available for kids at Place2Be, a U.K. charity which provides counseling in schools for which she is currently the royal patron. Middleton also holds the title for the Anna Freud Centre, another children's mental health charity aimed at reducing the burdens among young people. 

"There's things that you probably don't feel you want to share with your friends but at least you've got an adult to trust and to help you," she said to one little girl during the clip, driving home her message of aide through education.

"This Children's Mental Health Week, we want to support schools to prioritize the emotional well-being of their students, alongside academic success," Kate said in the video. "By ensuring every child is given the emotional support they need, we are giving them a firm foundation for the happy healthy future they deserve."