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Quentin Tarantino Blasted by Ennio Morricone, Composer Says He Won't Work With Him Again

Ennio Morricone, Quentin Tarartino Kevin Winter/Getty Images; Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images

Arrivederci, Quentin Tarantino…and good riddance?

Such is the sentiment expressed by Ennio Morricone, the man behind those iconic Spaghetti Western anthems the famed writer-director couldn't resist sampling in Kill Bill, Inglorious Basterds and most recently Django Unchained.

In a surpise move, the Italian composer is lashing out at Tarantino, who's one of his biggest fans, declaring he has no intention of collaborating with the filmmaker ever again because of the seemingly random way he uses his music in his movies.

"I wouldn't like to work with him again, on anything," The Hollywood Reporter quotes Morricone as telling a music, film and TV class at Rome's LUISS University. "He said last year he wanted to work with me again ever since Inglourious Basterds, but I told him I couldn't, because he didn't give me enough time. So he just used a song I had written previously."

Spike Lee slams Django Unchained: "Slavery Was Not a Spaghetti Western"

The 84-year-old music legend added that composing for Tarantino didn't interest him anymore because the self-proclaimed super geek "places music in his films without coherence" and "you can't do anything with someone like that."

As for his thoughts on Django Unchained, for which Morricone wrote the original song "Ancora Qui," he wasn't on the bandwagon despite the accolades the flick received, including a Best Original screenplay Academy Award for Q.T.

"To tell the truth, I didn't care for it," he said. "Too much blood."

Django Unchained racks up MTV Movie Award nominations

Ouch!

No word what Tarantino thinks of his idol's comments (though it's gotta be a bummer).  A rep for the Oscar winner was unavailable for comment.

Morricone has written music for over 500 films and was awarded an honorary Oscar for lifetime achievement in 2007. Among his most classic scores are those he did for Italian director Sergio Leone for his Man With No Name Trilogy (A Fistful of Dollars, For a Few Dollars More and The Good The Bad and the Ugly,) as well as those for John Carpenter's The Thing, The Untouchables, and Cinema Paradiso.

Check out these pics from Django Unchained

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