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Candace Cameron Bure has never been one to shy away from speaking her beliefs, but how is it accepted in Hollywood?

The devout Christian has come across differing (and sometimes televised) opinions with fellow peers in the industry concerning her faith, and while that may seem as if it would be difficult to bear for some, it isn't for the Fuller House star.

"It's not [difficult] for me. It's just who I am and I'm just being myself and we all have different viewpoints and different opinions in life. I think that's what makes the world go round," Bure tells E! News while promoting her new book, Dancing Through Life: Steps of Courage and Conviction.

"So I appreciate all those good conversations."

Candace Cameron Bure

E! Entertainment

In fact, she had one religiously driven conversation not too long ago that made headlines.

While appearing as a guest co-host on The View, Candace and Raven-Symoné went head to head in a heated debate over whether a bakery in Oregon had the right to refuse to bake a cake for a lesbian wedding. Host Whoopi Goldberg revealed that the owners of the bakery were asked to pay the couple $135,000. 

"The Oregon law bars businesses from discriminating against sexual orientation, race, disability, age or religion," Symoné argued, "and to me, it's the same exact thing that they did back in the day saying that black people couldn't do certain things because it's my 'religious belief.'"

"No," Cameron Buré interjected, holding up her hand to seemingly brush away Symoné's remarks. "I think you are comparing apples to oranges here. I don't think this is discrimination at all, this is about freedom of association, it's about constitutional rights, it's about First Amendment rights. We do still have the right to choose who we associate with—but they did not refuse to bake cakes."

"It's in the constitution," Candace continued. "They didn't refuse to bake the cake because of their sexual orientation, they baked a cake for them previously. They had a problem with the actual ceremony because that, the ceremony, is what conflicted with their religious beliefs."