Evan Rachel Wood

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Evan Rachel Wood knows her worth. Now, after two seasons of Westworld, she's finally seeing it reflected in her paycheck.

The 30-year-old actress told TheWrap she received a pay raise for season three and that her salary is now more in line with those of her male co-stars Anthony Hopkins and Ed Harris

"I think I'm just now to the point where I'm getting paid the same as my male co-stars," Wood told the media outlet.

Receiving equal pay was more than a financial victory for Wood. It was also a personal one. The Dolores Abernathy character said she "almost got emotional" when she learned about her pay bump.

"I've never been paid the same as my male counterparts," she told TheWrap. "Never, never."

In fact, the actress said she's made "pretty much the same amount of money on things for years." While she said she's "always fighting" for equal pay, she also said she's turned down projects because of disparities.

"I have not moved," Wood told the media outlet about her past experiences. "And I'm not saying I'm in like dire straits. I'm very lucky. It's more about if you're getting paid fairly, or the same, or if you're getting paid less simply because you're a woman, that's not fair."

At one point, Wood tried to make sense of the gap. 

"Westworld, it's like, I get it a little more," she said. "Because I'm like, ‘Well, you're Anthony Hopkins or, like, Ed Harris.'" Now, she knows she's getting equal pay for equal work.

While she said there are "a lot of politics" in the business, she also said "there's a lot of trying to make things equal and trying to make things fair."

"But this is the first time that somebody made a point of being like, ‘Hey you're getting this. And, like, you deserve it,'" she said. "And that was nice."

HBO declined TheWrap's request for comment.

Wood's interview comes shortly after HBO's Casey Bloys spoke about equal pay in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter

"We've proactively gone through all of our shows—in fact, we just finished our process where we went through and made sure that there were no inappropriate disparities in pay; and where there were, if we found any, we corrected it going forward," the programming head said. "And that's is a direct result of the Times Up movement."

To see the full interview, visit TheWrap.

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