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Michelle Obama, Ellen DeGeneres, The Ellen DeGeneres Show

Michael Rozman/Warner Bros.

The world has watched Malia Obama and Sasha Obama grow up.

When her family leaves the White House, First Lady Michelle Obama will do so knowing that she and President Barack Obama did the best they could, given the unusual circumstances. But what will the Obamas miss most? "It's really the people," Michelle said while co-hosting The Ellen DeGeneres Show Tuesday. "Think about it: The girls have grown up in the White House. I mean, the staff that's there—we see them every day. These are people who have helped us raise our kids. They've loved us. They've taken care of us. The minute we leave, that's it."

"It's really the people that we'll miss most," Michelle, 52, reiterated. "I'm sure the girls will have a tough time. They think they're ready, but when you've grown up in a place...I mean, imagine: They won't be able to knock on a door and say, 'Can I see my room?' That's not gonna happen. We're trying to have them step back and really appreciate the walk on the South Lawn, sitting on the Truman Balcony. I mean, we just want to keep creating some memories for them as well."

Malia, 18, will be taking a gap year before college, while Sasha, 15, will finish out high school in Washington, D.C. "I'm proud of them they've really managed this so well," Michelle said. "I mean, I just love them to death and the big thing I've always worried about was making sure that they got out of this whole. I'm just proud that they are poised, smart, intelligent young women."

Host Ellen DeGeneres commended Michelle, saying, "It's hard enough to raise children, period, but to raise children in front of everyone and in the White House—you've done an amazing job."

Michelle Obama, Ellen DeGeneres, The Ellen DeGeneres Show

Michael Rozman/Warner Bros.

Later on, Ellen asked Michelle about her legacy and if she ever felt "pressure" to be the first African American First Lady of the United States. "Well, one of the things I know from sitting in this position, that every First Lady feels some level of pressure. I mean this is a big platform and you don't want to mess it up. So I wouldn't dare to compare my experience to any former First Lady, but I do take the role seriously," she said. "As I said in my convention speech, I know that kids are watching us, they're watching what we say, what we do, and Barack and I have tried to make sure that what kids are seeing is something that they can be proud of because It matters."

Michelle said it was an "honor" to be FLOTUS for the past eight years. "I wasn't the political spouse. I was very hesitant about this, but it's truly been an honor to serve, to travel this country, to meet so many great people," she told Ellen. "I have so much hope for this nation and I hope that everybody else does, too. We have some great young people. We've got great communities. I just wish everyone had the opportunity to travel the country like we have, because you would feel good every day about where we live. This is the best country on earth."