Robbie Blankenship, Jesse Cruz, Kim Davis

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For a large portion of Tuesday afternoon, Kim Davis was trending worldwide on Twitter. 

The Kentucky clerk has gained national-wide attention for her refusal to issue gay couples a marriage license in spite of the Supreme Court's landmark ruling in June that same-sex couples have the right to marry

Davis, who has lived in Rowan County all her life, has repeatedly cited "God's authority" as her reason for defying the federal courts and denying the marriage licenses. She and her entire staff are expected to appear in front of a federal judge tomorrow, who will decide whether the Rowan Country clerk is in contempt of court.  

In spite of tomorrow's hearing, the New York Times reports that Davis rejected yet another gay couple's request to obtain a marriage license on Wednesday. The publication also states that Davis, who is an elected official and therefore cannot be fired, has refused licenses to heterosexual couples. 

Meanwhile, in the wake of the controversy, Davis has come under fire and been called a hypocrite for her own personal past as it has been revealed that the county clerk, who describes herself as an Apostolic Christian (a denomination which seeks to interpret the Bible literally), has been married four times and has two children out of wedlock. 

U.S. News has obtained court records that show that Davis has been divorced three times: once in 1994, again in 2006 and a third time in 2008. 

According to reports, Davis married Dwain Wallace when she was just 18 but the couple divorced in 1994. Two years later, she married Joe Davis, and they were together for 10 years. Following their divorce, Davis wed  Thomas McIntyre when she was 40 years old. Their marriage lasted less than a year and he fathered her twins, who were later adopted by Joe Davis, her second husband, when the two remarried in 2009. 

Currently, Davis is being sued by four couples, two gay and two straight, who argue that she must fulfill her duties as an elected official, in spite of her religious beliefs (she stopped issuing licenses in June after the Supreme Court's ruling). A federal judge ordered her to issues the licenses and an appeals court upheld that decision.  

Davis is represented by lawyers at the Liberty Counsel, a non-profit firm that provides free legal counsel in defense of "Christian religious liberty." 

"I never imagined a day like this would come, where I would be asked to violate a central teaching of Scripture and of Jesus Himself regarding marriage," she said in a statement on Tuesday. "To issue a marriage license which conflicts with God's definition of marriage, with my name affixed to the certificate, would violate my conscience. It is not a light issue for me. It is a Heaven or Hell decision."

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