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Olivia Wilde, Jason Sudeikis, Otis


Between a new lead role on HBO, a toddler and a vibrant Hollywood fiancé, Olivia Wilde seems to have all the best life has to offer. Still, she's in no rush to finish off the trifecta by walking down the aisle. 

After two years of dating, the Vinyl actress said "Yes!" to beau Jason Sudeikis when E! News confirmed in January 2013 that he had popped the question. A little over a year later, Wilde gave birth to the couples first child, a son named Otis Alexander Sudeikis. While first came baby, many are wondering three years after their engagement when the marriage will officially come. According to the 31-year-old, the lovebirds don't need a marriage license—they have a far more powerful force to keep them bound together. 

"We are seriously connected," she told NET-A-PORTER.com's The EDIT. "Before you have a child, marriage is the ultimate commitment and promise to one another, and then once you have a child, it's like, ‘Oh, we're committed and promised already.'"

Olivia Wilde, The EDIT


In fact, the outspoken actress is not a fan of another convention—male dominance in film and television. 

"It's institutional. It's not conscious," she said. "People don't realize what they're saying, because you hear it from both men and women. But there's this sense that a project is incomplete if there's no male participation."

Fortunately, the tides are changing on the shores of Hollywood, even if the evolving efforts are not exactly perfect. 

"People are now saying, ‘Listen, you need to hire women, specifically because they are women,' and although that's uncomfortable, it's how things change," she said. "When I was younger, it felt like the main point was that [I was] one of the attractive actresses, and I felt totally minimized by it, as everyone does. But it's worn off, in a good way; I'm happy to have grown out of the place where that is the main point made about me."

Experiencing that kind of sexism firsthand, Wilde is even more supportive of eliminating women's single definitions. 

"The media always chooses one element of you to assign as your identity plaque: ‘She's the mom, she's political, she's the one who is really pretty,'" she listed off. "But we are all of those things."

To see The EDIT's full interview with Olivia Wilde, visit here or download the free EDIT app at the App Store and Google Play.