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Sinead O'Connor

Rob Ball/WireImage

Sinéad O'Connor has apparently stopped caring that much about U since she recorded what became her signature hit.

The oft-tempestuous singer announced over the weekend that she is going to stop singing "Nothing Compares 2 U" live, giving her fans a heads-up via Facebook so that no one would get too disappointed if they attended a concert and didn't hear the classic breakup ballad.

And, not surprisingly, it sounds as though O'Connor did plenty of soul-searching before arriving at this decision.

"OK, the time has come for me to cease singing Nothing Compares 2U," the Irish artist wrote on Saturday.

"The first principle of the manner in which I'm trained as a singer (Bel Canto) is we never sing a song we don't emotionally identify with. After twenty-five years of singing it, nine months or so ago I finally ran out of anything I could use in order to bring some emotion to it.

"I don't want audiences to be disappointed coming along to a show and then not hearing it," she continued, "so am letting you know here that you won't. If I were to sing it just to please people, I wouldn't be doing my job right, because my job is to be emotionally available. I'd be lying. You'd be getting a lie. My job is to give you honesty. I'm trained in honesty. I can't act. It just isn't in my training. I have ceased singing other songs over the years for the same reason."

And if O'Connor is anything in addition to a vocal powerhouse, it's outspokenly honest.

O'Connor's version of "Nothing Compares 2 U," which was written by Prince, was the second single off of the 1990 album I Do Not Want What I Haven't Got and is easily her most well-known song.

The  iconic music video was named Video of the Year at the 1990 MTV VMAs, back when videos actually were in regular rotation on MTV, and the song charted at No. 1 all over the world.

O'Connor's Facebook feed instantly filled up with both support and concern, with fan Sher Jewell-Geary writing, "Even if it does not stir emotion for you, it does for others. Just a consideration."

But still others congratulated O'Connor on a song well sung and promised to hang on every word of the likes of "Troy" and "The Emperor's New Clothes."