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Angie Stone, Mug Shot

DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office

Angie Stone's daughter is now short a few teeth thanks to her mom—but the singer is claiming self-defense!

The 53-year-old R&B artist has been charged with aggravated assault after hitting her 30-year-old daughter in the face with a metal stand during an altercation Monday, according to the DeKalb County Police incident report obtained by E! News.

The report states that Stone (born Angela Brown) told authorities that Diamond Stone hit her first with a closed fist, while a family friend who broke up the fight could not say for certain who struck first.

Diamond Stone reportedly told the cops, meanwhile, that the fight started when her mom walked into her room and ordered her to get her two children (Angie's grandchildren) under control. They started arguing and "that's when a physical altercation started to occur," police wrote in the report.

Angie Stone

Bennett Raglin/Getty Images

Stone told police that she didn't realize she had hit her daughter with the stand "and once she realized this she quickly put the stand down and attempted to get away from Ms. Diamond Stone," the report continues. "Ms. Angie Stone then stated while she tried to get away from Ms. Diamond Stone continued to come after her until their friend intervened.

Both women were taken into custody and questioned; Diamond was released and Stone was booked on a charge of domestic aggravated assault.

Diamond is Stone's daughter with ex-husband Rodney Stone, of the 1970s and '80s-era hip-hop group Funky Four Plus One.

She also has a son, Michael, with soul singer D'Angelo.

The "U-Haul" singer, a three-time Grammy nominee, has appeared on Celebrity Fit Club and TV One's R&B Divas in recent years. She told Ebony in 2013 about appearing on R&B Divas, "What I bring to the dynamic is, I know what you don't know. I see it because I've been where you are already and I'm still surviving. The reason I'm still relevant and a survivor is because I learned from the people before me. There is a message to the madness. And one of the things is learning how to get out of your own way, knowing when to keep the car on the road and always remain a first-class act, if to no one but yourself."