• Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
Say adios to a 2001 edition of the Latin Grammys.

With the music awards fest canceled following last Tuesday's terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, D.C., the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences and Latin Recording Academy said Friday that there will be no rescheduled ceremony.

With logistical problems mounting, Recording Academy President Michael Greene released a statement acknowledging that "it is simply impossible to reschedule a live, international show of this magnitude.

"We all are emotionally devastated by recent events, as is everyone, and we're disappointed that we will not be able to give this year's deserving nominees their chance to show the world what we already know about them--that they are world-class musical artists," Greene said. "We currently are determining the best way to award the winners their Latin Grammys and will be making an announcement regarding this very soon. We appreciate everyone's patience and support through this very difficult time."

While it may have been possible to push back the Latin Grammys to later in the fall, several factors were working against the Academy. In addition to finding a suitable new date for performers and nominees, organizers also would have had to book a new venue during awards season.

Then there's the overall mood of most Americans, who aren't anxious to see glamour-soaked awards shows, while performers aren't anxious to appear on them (or, in the case of some, even step on a plane to get there).

Prior to last week, the Latin Grammys had already encountered its share of difficulties. In August, the Academy announced that it was shipping the show from Miami to Los Angeles, over fears of violence against Cuban performers by anti-Castro protesters.

The first Latin Grammy ceremony was staged one year prior at L.A.'s Staples Center, which was slated to be the new venue for last Tuesday's ceremony.