2016 Rio Olympics by the Numbers, Top

Melissa Hebeler / E! Illustration

Let the games begin! Or, we should say, let the math begin. 

Yes, the 31st Olympiad are well underway and things have been everything we expected. There was high drama in the swimming pool. The Final Five won gold (again). Aly Raisman's parents were super stressed. Everybody's online dating. In other words, it's been a very successful few weeks in Rio de Janeiro. 

But of course, simply watching the nightly broadcast or reading Twitter the next day doesn't tell the whole story. There's so much going on behind the scenes to make the Olympics happen every day, and it's time to take a closer look. And yes, we're going to use math—or numbers, rather. We pulled together all the craziest facts and figures to give some insight into the Olympic world on the other side of the camera. 

2016 Rio Olympics by the Numbers

Melissa Hebeler / E! Illustration

42: Number of sports in competition. That includes everything from race walking to the hammer throw to handball.

4,924: Number of medals handed out during all 42 sports. 

11,000: Number athletes competing, from over 200 different countries. This year also includes a special Refugee Olympic Team, with athletes hailing from Syria, South Sudan, Ethiopia, and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

$1,200: The cost of one single gymnastics leotard for a member of the Final Five, which were designed and created in none other than Reading, Pennsylvania. 

5,000: Number of Swarovski crystals on one single Final Five leotard.

75,000: Approximate attendance of the Olympics' Opening Ceremonies. 

500,000: Total visitors expected in Rio during the Games. 

$6,000: Average cost of a trip to Rio during the Olympics for one of those 500,000 visitors. 

2: New sports added to the slate in 2016. (And yes, those would be Golf and Rugby).

37: Number of venues hosting different sporting events.

$11.5 Billion: Estimated cost of hosting the Rio Olympics.

450,000: Number of condoms provided to the athletes.

175,000: Number of satchets of lubricant provided to the athletes.

42: Number of condoms per athlete.

460,000: Pounds of food per day that the Olympic dining hall can accommodate—it also happens to be as long as four Olympic swimming pools. 

2,500: Number of people working in the Olympic dining hall.

40: Number of different varieties of Brazilian fruit available at the dining hall.

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