George Clooney

Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

George Clooney has a lot of thoughts on the recent scandal surrounding the Sony hacking and pulling The Interview from theaters, and he openly shared all of that during an interview with Deadline.

The A-list actor, who was one of many notable names involved in the leaked emails, explains why the studio opted to scrap the Seth Rogen and James Franco flick while also discussing the lack of support from others in industry and urging everyone to see the bigger picture at hand—which is, mainly, that we're now allowing North Korea to dictate what we watch.

"Here, we're talking about an actual country deciding what content we're going to have. This affects not just movies, this affects every part of business that we have. That's the truth. What happens if a newsroom decides to go with a story, and a country or an individual or corporation decides they don't like it. Forget the hacking part of it," Clooney says.

"You have someone threaten to blow up buildings and all of a sudden, everybody has to bow down. Sony didn't pull the movie because they were scared. They pulled the movie because all the theaters said they were not going to run it. And they said they were not going to run it because they talked to their lawyers and those lawyers said, if somebody dies in one of these, then you're going to be responsible."

James Franco, Seth Rogen, Kim Jong Un

Sony Pictures, Ed Jones/AFP/GettyImages

He continues, "This is a silly comedy, but the truth is, what it now says about us is a whole lot. We have a responsibility to stand up against this. That's not just Sony, but all of us, including my good friends in the press who have the responsibility to be asking themselves, what was important, what was the important story to be covering here. The hacking is terrible because of the damage they did to all those people. Their medical records, that is a horrible thing, their Social Security numbers. Then, to turn around and threaten to blow people up and kill people, and just by that threat alone we change what we do for a living, that's the actual definition of terrorism."

Clooney shared that he drafted a petition in hopes of uniting head executives and business professionals during this troublesome time. It read:

On November 24 of this year, Sony Pictures was notified that it was the victim of a cyber attack, the effects of which is the most chilling and devastating of any cyber attack in the history of our country. Personal information including Social Security numbers, email addresses, home addresses, phone numbers and the full texts of emails of tens of thousands of Sony employees was leaked online in an effort to scare and terrorize these workers. The hackers have made both demands and threats. The demand that Sony halt the release of its upcoming comedy The Interview, a satirical film about North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un. Their threats vary from personal—you better behave wisely—to threatening physical harm—not only you but your family is in danger. North Korea has not claimed credit for the attack but has praised the act, calling it a righteous deed and promising merciless measures if the film is released. Meanwhile the hackers insist in their statement that what they've done so far is only a small part of our further plan. This is not just an attack on Sony. It involves every studio, every network, every business and every individual in this country. That is why we fully support Sony's decision not to submit to these hackers' demands. We know that to give in to these criminals now will open the door for any group that would threaten freedom of expression, privacy and personal liberty. We hope these hackers are brought to justice but until they are, we will not stand in fear. We will stand together.

James Franco, Lizzy Caplan, Seth Rogen, The Interview

Columbia Pictures

Not one person signed it.

"All that it is basically saying is, we're not going to give in to a ransom. As we watched one group be completely vilified, nobody stood up. Nobody took that stand," he says.

The actor also noted that a lot of people's attention was so focused on the salacious aspect of the email leaks, that they missed what was really happening right in front of their face. "I don't know what the answer is, but what happened here is part of a much larger deal. A huge deal. And people are still talking about dumb emails. Understand what is going on right now, because the world just changed on your watch, and you weren't even paying attention."

Clooney revealed that Sony exec Amy Pascal, who was at the center of a lot of the hacked emails, is at a crossroads with what to do concerning the film.

George Clooney

CIAO/AKM-GSI

"I just talked to Amy an hour ago. She wants to put that movie out. What do I do? My partner Grant Heslov and I had the conversation with her this morning. Bryan and I had the conversation with her last night. Stick it online. Do whatever you can to get this movie out. Not because everybody has to see the movie, but because I'm not going to be told we can't see the movie. That's the most important part. We cannot be told we can't see something by Kim Jong Un, of all f--king people."

Oh dang, get it George!

As far as where we go from here, the celeb states, "I've seen statements they've put out and what the president said and what the response is. The truth is, it's all new territory and nobody knows how to handle it. I don't think anyone was prepared for it. So now we'll be prepared for it, hopefully. Everybody was doing their jobs, but somehow, we have allowed North Korea to dictate content, and that is just insane."

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