Meghan Markle and Prince Harry continue to be a force for good.

The pair is donating profits from their royal wedding in 2018 to the organization Feeding Britain, which The Archbishop of Canterbury, who presided over the Sussexes' May 2018 marriage, is President of, according to a spokesperson for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. In total, a sum of $112,000 will go towards helping food banks and local community food organizations, as well as other avenues, which is especially important amid the coronavirus pandemic.  

In a statement, the couple's spokesperson shared, "The Duke and Duchess were able to speak to The Archbishop recently, and were moved to hear all about the work Feeding Britain was doing to support people during COVID-19. They have particularly fond memories of their visit to the citizens' supermarket in Birkenhead, especially the generosity and compassion of everyone working there to help others. They are delighted to be able to ensure this money is donated to such a great cause."

Meghan and Harry were able to make the sizable donation thanks to the BBCs telecast of their nuptials in 2018. According to Town & County magazine, the couple asked the BBC to donate excess profit in their name and were "notified about the funds around the time the coronavirus pandemic was taking hold."

Meghan Markle, Duchess Of Sussex

Danny Lawson/PA Images via Getty Images

"It is understood the Sussexes thought it was fitting that funds generated from their wedding go to a charity supported by the Archbishop, who played such an important role on the day," a source told the magazine. 

The Archbishop and others are grateful to receive the funds as it "will keep breakfast, lunch and dinner, so three square meals, on the table of many tens of thousands of children across our network," according to the organization director Andrew Dorsey.

Meghan and Harry were able to see firsthand the good work the organization does when they met with the volunteers and workers in January 2019, when she was still pregnant with baby Archie Harrison. At the time, royal watchers could hardly predict that the Duke and Duchess would part from the Royal Family just a year later.  

Now, the pair is no longer senior members of the firm and are branching out on their own with their non-profit Archewell, named after their infant son. This means that this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to their good deeds. The couple promises to "do something of meaning, to do something that matters" with their new organization. 

For now, however, the mum and dad are focused on staying healthy and spending all the time they can with little Archie, who turns one this month.  They will be celebrating on their own this year, as the rest of the family is across the pond in Great Britain and traveling is halted because of the coronavirus. 

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