It's time for Justin Sylvester to take a sip.

In just the past couple of weeks alone, the host of E! News' digital series Just the Sip has been able to get Evelyn Lozada, Christina Milian, Jason Wahler and more stars to open up like never before.

But in this week's episode, the roles are being reversed as Justin is put in the hot seat thanks to his close friend and co-worker Nina Parker.

During the emotional conversation, Justin explained how his move to Los Angeles allowed him to feel comfortable to come out as a gay man. And yes, the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills may have played a role too.

"I was working for Kyle Richards and I was out to certain people in my life and this woman on the show hosted a gays and gals party for the Real Housewives of Beverly Hills," he recalled. "It was my first year working here and she invited me to it and she said, ‘Hey, this is the party. I know you're not completely out yet so you can decide if you want to come to this or not. I would love for you to come with me.'"

Soon after, Justin called his mom and had a "conversation" that was far from dramatic.

"She never made it a big deal," he shared. "She knew."

Kyle Richards

Aaron Poole, E! News

In addition to Kyle, there was another familiar face who helped Justin shine in Los Angeles. As it turns out, Ali Landry had a positive influence on his life.

"When I moved here, when I was 22, the first person I ever lived with was Ali Landry. She kind of held my hand through this whole LA thing and introduced me to Kyle and once I started working with Kyle, we got to a point after the first season where she became family to me," he shared. "I spent Christmas there. I've been there for holidays. If I need somewhere to stay, she got me…that's just the world I got thrown into."

During the candid discussion, Justin also opened up about race in the United States. As a man from Louisiana, the Daily Pop co-host was the first to admit that some questioned why he hung out with white people.

Justin Sylvester

E!

But according to Justin, he simply spends time with people who treat him with respect.

"I got it a lot when I was a kid. I just got so used to it and I didn't really care and I don't see color when I see friends," he shared. "I just put myself around people that I care about and people that I love. When I was growing up, there were people that didn't see color to me and now I don't ever want to see color."

"I fought so hard to become the person that I am," Justin added. "I fought so hard to be accepted for who I am on the inside that I'm not going to let someone determine how black or white I need to be."

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