Amy Poehler

Jim Spellman/WireImage.com

Amy Poehler is about to birth herself a baby and a new TV show, and she's now decided to kick Saturday Night Live to the curb sooner than expected.

Although it was widely known that Poehler would leave the late-night sketch show after this season, no timetable had been announced. But NBC confirmed today to E! News that Poehler would not be back after she breaks for maternity leave in a few weeks.

Poelher's due to become a real-life baby mama in late October/early November. After she takes a brief hiatus (presumably to teach husband Will Arnett the ins and outs of diaper changing), she will go straight to work on her new, still untitled mockumentary show from the producers of The Office.

Meaning she will officially be a Ready for Primetime Player and her services will no longer be required on SNL after nearly seven years.

"It's gonna be really hard—Boyz II Men hard—to say goodbye to yesterday," Poehler recently joked to Men's Vogue of her depature.

"SNL was dangerous, late-night, last-minute and star-studded, but like any good drug, you need to know when to put it down."

The decision not to pull double-duty and forgo a return to SNL will also give Poehler more time to focus on her burgeoning big-screen career, which has included such films as Blades of Glory, Mr. Woodcock, Baby Mama and most recently Hamlet 2.

Poelher, who turns 37 today, joined Saturday Night Live in 2001 as a featured performer and became the first comic since Eddie Murphy to be promoted to full-time cast member in her first season.

Poehler eventually rose through the ranks and became anchor of Weekend Update, while offering spot-on impersonations of Kelly Ripa, Sharon Osbourne, Madonna and Hillary Clinton. Poehler and pal Tina Fey opened last weekend's show doing an instant classic sketch as Clinton and GOP veep wannabe Sarah Palin, and Poehler hopes to remain through the election, depending, of course, on when the baby decides to make its debut.

Poehler is up for her first Emmy this weekend for her SNL work. Her nomination, for Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series, is the first individual nod for an SNL performer since Will Ferrell turned up in a variety category in 2001.

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