Juice Wrld may be gone, but his work will always be here.

Two weeks after his tragic death, British Beats 1 radio host Charlie Sloth released a never-before-seen freestyle with the rapper from his series, Fire In the Booth.

"This was recorded in February 2019 in L.A.," the video begins. "With the sad passing of Juice WRLD, we wanted to share this with his fans. We believe Juice WRLD's Fire in the Booth was one of the greatest freestyles ever."

In the nearly 15 minute clip, the 21-year-old (real name: Jarad Higgins) raps about drugs, race and money. "I'm a rebel / I'm a rockstar / I take it to the grave," he says. "Molly at the rave / Yes I misbehave / Molly at the rave, yes I misbehave."

After six minutes of impressive freestyle, Juice asks Charlie to challenge him by throwing out random words and phrases for him to rap about. On the list: Threesomes, free 21 Savage and Cardi B.

"Hey Cardi B, she got them hits too / Cardi B, she that bitch too," he raps. "Cardi, yeah she rich too / I'm tryna get Cardi B rich, you feel me fool?"

Just days after his 21st birthday, on December 8, the "Lucid Dreams" artist died after suffering a seizure at Chicago's Midway Airport. Following his passing, Chief Communications Officer for the Chicago Police Department Anthony Guglielmi shared more details on the rapper's final hours. According to Guglielmi, police and federal agents had been waiting for Juice's flight to arrive from L.A., claiming they were notified that his plane was carrying "weapons and narcotics." 

After a search of their luggage, police found 70 pounds of marijuana and six bottles of prescription codeine cough syrup. Investigators also discovered two 9mm pistols, a .40 caliber pistol, a high-capacity ammunition magazine and metal-piercing bullets.

His girlfriend Ally Lotti later told police that while Juice did not have any medical ailments, he did regularly take Percocet.

Indeed, rapper's battle with drugs was no secret. "As he often addressed in his music and to his fans, Jarad battled with prescription drug dependency," his mom Carmella Wallace said in a statement. "Addiction knows no boundaries and its impact goes way beyond the person fighting it. Jarad was a son, brother, grandson, friend and so much more to so many people who wanted more than anything to see him defeat addiction."

"We hope the conversations he started in his music and his legacy will help others win their battles as that is what he wanted more than anything," she continued. "We know that Jarad's legacy of love, joy and emotional honesty will live on."

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