David Spade, Kate Spade, Chris Farley

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It's been a little over a year since Kate Spade's tragic death.

David Spade reflected on his sister-in-law's passing in a new interview with The New York Times published Monday. 

"Katy was so funny," he told the newspaper. "I don't know if agoraphobic is a word, but she didn't like to mingle a lot; she'd have people at her house and she was always so funny." 

The fashion designer was found unconscious and unresponsive in her New York apartment on Tuesday, June 5, 2018. The Medical Examiner's Office ruled her death suicide by hanging. Her husband, Andy Spade, later revealed she had "suffered from anxiety and depression for many years," and that she was "actively seeking help and working closely with her doctors to treat her disease." 

"I feel like Katy wouldn't have done it, five minutes later," David said. "But these things happen and there's no going back."

Sadly, this wasn't the first time the comedy star had lost a loved one. According to The New York Times, his stepfather took his own life when David was 15. He also had a few "close friends" pass away during his high school and college years.

"People just started going right and left, and I would sit and stare at a wall," David recalled, later adding: "I just said, 'OK, I guess I'll cross my fingers that it doesn't happen to everyone.' And more people would go."

David also recently mourned the death of comedian Brody Stevenswho frequently opened his acts and committed suicide in February.

In addition, he said he still receives hateful comments from fans mourning the death of Chris Farley—who died of a drug overdose in 1997—including one that read, "I wish you died instead of Chris Farley."

"The first couple times it was rough," he told The New York Times, "but now it's the standard burn. I wish I didn't get that three times a week."

In fact, he suspects that some fans will never get used to seeing him without his Saturday Night Live and Tommy Boy co-star.

"But do you just stop doing what you're doing because of a tragedy?" he asked. "You have to go, 'Well, I still like doing this.' Some people won't be interested. But I did three sitcoms after that. It wasn't totally horrible."

While experiencing all of these losses hasn't been easy, David continues to move forward. He's even starring in a new late-night series called Lights Out With David Spade.

"I don't want to say I'm immune to it," he said, "but there's a way you just have to learn to shut off the tear valve. It's just too brutal." 

To read his full interview, check out The New York Times.

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