Emma Stone, Viola Davis, Ava Duvernay, Natalie Portman, Meryl Streep

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While The Academy made strides to add more diverse members to its organization, the 2017 Oscar nominations revealed that women are still underrepresented.

A study by the Women's Media Center found that women only made up 20 percent of the nominees in non-acting categories, which is down 2 percent from last year. This year also failed to see a woman nominated in the Best Director category, and it's also the 89th year in which a woman hasn't been included in the cinematographer category. Eighty-nine also happens to be the entire history of the iconic award show.

But it wasn't all bad. The study praised Ava DuVernay's nomination for best documentary feature for 13th, as well as Jackie composter Mica Levi for being the first female in the category in 17 years.

The study also revealed that nine female producers were nominated in the Best Picture category, which is the largest nominations count in any category.

"We have a saying: 'If you can see it, you can be it,'" Julie Burton, president of the Women's Media Center told Entertainment Weekly, "but in the crucial behind-the-scenes non-acting roles, our investigation shows that what you see is 80 percent of all nominees are men. Four out of five nominees are men—meaning male voices and perspectives are largely responsible for what we see onscreen."

Even though the year made massive strides for women onscreen, with movies such as La La Land, Hidden Figures, Jackie and Florence Foster Jenkins all featuring female leads, only Emma Stone's movie made the cut in the Best Picture category.

"The perspectives, experiences, and voices of more than half the population deserve an equal seat at the table," Burton says.

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