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Laverne Cox, Cosmopolitan

Ruven Afanador/Cosmopolitan

Laverne Cox has a new look.

The Orange Is the New Black star appears in Cosmpolitan's October issue, but she doesn't look like herself. Starring in the upcoming revamp of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, Cox opens up to the magazine about stars that inspired her to break out of her shell and try a vastly different role than what she's normally used to. In the special photo shoot, Cox uncannily transforms into icons Beyoncé, Tina Turner and trailblazing model Tracey Africa.

"Beyoncé represents excellence. Her work ethic is like nobody else I've ever seen," Cox shares. "There were so many moments when I was shooting Rocky Horror and I'd be exhausted. My body would be hurting and I'd be like, 'Beyoncé. Beyoncé does this. You have to just put in the work."

Cox perfectly channels Beyoncé's I Am...Sasha Fierce "Single Ladies" look, wearing the signature black leotard, cat eye-style shadow and half up, half down hairdo.

Laverne Cox, Cosmopolitan

Ruven Afanador/Cosmopolitan

Whenever Cox feels like she's going through a hard time, however, she thinks of rock-and-roll legend Turner. "The pain, pleasure, and agony of all she's been through is in her voice," Cox explains. "Her story is the story of so many black women who've endured abuse and come out the other side in such a brilliant, beautiful way."

Once again Cox looks almost identical to Turner, putting her long legs on display in a short leather skirt while dancing around for the camera. Clearly Cox had a lot of fun imitating one of her personal heroes. Dancing in denim, Cox kicks, twirls and prances much like the "What's Love Got to Do With It" songstress.

Laverne Cox, Cosmopolitan

Ruven Afanador/Cosmopolitan

Although many consider Cox to be a trailblazer in the trans community, the OITNB actress tells Cosmopolitan that she didn't do it all on her own; she had someone else to turn to: Tracey Africa.

"She was a black trans woman who modeled in the '70s and had cosmetics deals and a hair con­tract with Clairol—it was a big deal. People think, 'Oh, this trans revolution is just starting,' but we've been around for a very long time," Cox tells the magazine. "It's important to know that there's been a path blazed for me."