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Naya Rivera is really opening up in her forthcoming memoir, Sorry Not Sorry: Dreams, Mistakes and Growing Up.

The Glee alum candidly discusses her struggle with anorexia, a past abortion and more in her debut book, and that's not all. Rivera also opens up about a big decision she made when she was 18 years old: plastic surgery. While she was in high school, Rivera decided to use the money she had saved from roles on Family Matters and The Royal Family to get breast implants.

"I went around to all my teachers, told them I was going to be out," she writes in Sorry Not Sorry, as excerpted by People. "'I'm getting plastic surgery!' I'd tell them gleefully. My new boobs were a confidence thing, not a sexual thing. I'd never even taken my top off for a guy. I hadn't had many opportunities to do so, but even if I had, my bra was always stuffed with napkins."

Vanity Fair Young Hollywood, Naya Rivera

Joe Scarnici/Getty Images for Vanity Fair

After she increased her cup size, life at school began to drastically change. "As soon as I went back to school, [the boys] all practically fell over themselves rushing to see who could hold the door open for me," she recalls. "People have a lot of opinions about plastic surgery, but more than 10 years after I got my boobs, they still make me happy when I look in the mirror."

Despite the hefty price tag, Rivera has no regrets. "It might have been the best $8k I've ever spent," she writes.

Sorry Not Sorry is full of candid confessions from the star, who also opens up about her struggles with an eating disorder in high school. "By the time I was a sophomore, I started feeling that what had begun as a game had maybe gone too far. I just avoided food at all costs," she writes in the book. "If my mom had packed a lunch for me, I'd either trash it or find some excuse to give it away." 

But when she started writing her memoir, River began to realize the severity of her issues. "I was so young and it just seemed to be the norm. Everyone was going through similar stuff," she explains. "I had no way of knowing if I was going through it worse. I was juggling my feelings and it makes me sad that there are girls still going through that 15 years after I went through it."

Rivera's memoir is out Sept. 13, 2016.