Rob Lowe

Aurora Rose/startraksphoto.com

Emma Watson isn't the only one speaking out against sexism in Hollywood. 

Rob Lowe is lashing out against the objectification of men on television, according to a new interview with Vulture. The 51-year-old star of Fox's new comedy series, The Grinder, spoke candidly about how he feels male characters are poorly written on TV—all while calling out a Shonda Rhimes favorite. 

"People go on and on about the objectification of women, and rightly so," Lowe began. "But, what about the objectification of men? When was the last time you saw Grey's Anatomy?"

The Parks and Recreation actor, who has played his fair share of quintessential heartthrobs since his first on-screen role in 1979, used his experience as a storied actor to shape the character he portrays on Fox's new show, which he also produces. 

"We did a whole sequence of why [Dean Sanderson] left The Grinder. And the reason he left is he felt objectified," Lowe revealed. So what I love about this show is these wry, insightful looks at contemporary culture in entertainment as seen through the eyes of a regular Idaho family." Seems like a classic case of art imitating life.  

Rob Lowe, GQ October 2015

Peggy Sirota / GQ

Lowe is also quick to clarify that, no, The Grinder is not about the iPhone app. 

"Oh, this is my favorite thing!" Lowe said about the incessant questions regarding the show's title. "News flash: We're being funny on purpose. You can all rest easy."

Instead, the show is about a down-on-his-luck actor who previously starred as a lawyer on a hit show called...The Grinder. After leaving the show, he decides to take his skills to court full-time—only he has no actual certification. Hilarity ensues. 

Lowe does tease one particular episode in which he is featured alongside Jason Alexander. He said this scene alone forced him to "leave his dignity at the altar of comedy."

"I very slowly and shamefully unbutton my shirt and then he looks at me and I realize what he wants to see is nipple. It's a parody of that great Irene Cara scene in Fame, which I've never forgotten. There's nothing funnier than a sad, shameful stripper — when played by a man."

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