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George Clooney, Amal Clooney

Josiah Kamau/BuzzFoto via Getty Images

George Clooney celebrated another anniversary this week!

Despite the rainy weather, the actor was all smiles when he attended the New York Film Festival's 15th anniversary screening of O Brother, Where Art Thou? in New York City Tuesday. He arrived with his wife, Amal Clooney, with whom he recently celebrated one year of marriage. "We sure are having fun," the actor, 54, told People on the red carpet. "We had a beautiful anniversary, and we're having fun."

Asked what he's learned about marriage in the last 12 months, the twice-wed movie star played coy. "That's a good question, but I can't officially tell you any of those things because that would be wrong," George cheekily told People, joking that the human rights lawyer "would be upset that I told anyone what I've learned."

As E! News reported Monday, George and Amal enjoyed a dinner at Asenebo in Studio City, Calif., to commemorate their first year of marriage. George also spent their anniversary honoring his producer pal Jerry Weintraub at a memorial in L.A.

Amal didn't join George for photos on the red carpet Tuesday. Perhaps if she had, her husband would have been less nervous to see himself in O Brother, Where Art Thou? again. "I mean, drinking is gonna be my secret going in there to watching myself 15 years ago. On a big screen? Holy s--t!" he joked. "That's pretty rough."

George reunited on the red carpet with his co-stars Tim Blake Nelson and John Turturro, as well as directors Ethan Cohen and Joel Coen. The actors have gone on to direct their own movies since starring in the 2000 comedy, but Joel didn't want to take credit for their directorial successes. "They're all smart guys who understand how movies are made. All three of them," he said of George, Tim and John. "They're good, but they had it all by themselves, without anything from us."

Still, George learned a lot by taking direction from the Coen Brothers. "They shoot eight-hour days—they're that prepared," he told The Hollywood Reporter. "They only shoot what they need, and that's a great lesson that I try to do all the time."