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Chloe Grace Moretz, Complex

Tony Kelly

Chloë Grace Moretz is politely declining. 

At 19 years old, the former child actress has worked with some of Hollywood's most legendary stars—Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Julianne Moore and Denzel Washington just to name a few. However, there's one particular celebrity circle she's in no hurry to join—that of Taylor Swift

When asked whether she had been invited into the Grammy winner's legendary girl gang, the actress told Complex she had in fact received an invitation. However, had she accepted the offer? "She's a very talented person," Moretz simply replied. While she would not elaborate on that particular topic, she would speak to modern Hollywood's concept of the "girl squad." Spoiler alert: she's not a fan. 

"They appropriate exclusivity," she told the magazine. "They're cliques!"

A staunch feminist, the Brain on Fire actress has her own clear definition of what equality among the sexes means. 

"It's not just about women being powerful," she says. "It's about races being powerful; genders being powerful."

Chloe Grace Moretz, Complex

Tony Kelly

Judging by her vocal views on women's rights, some would ask Moretz what she's doing starring as Ariel in a remake of The Little Mermaid—a narrative that has been highly debated by the feminist community in the years since its first silver screen debut. Well, to shatter the glass ceiling to shreds, of course. 

"We want to make this good for girls," she explained. "We can't make this regressive tale in a modern world. We're going to flip it on its head. It's going to feel good for women and men in the sense that it's not just appropriating feminism, and it's not leaning on regressive stereotypes."

Despite her clear sense of self, this teenager wasn't always as secure about expressing her social stances. 

"There were definitely moments when I was 13 or 14 and was worried about not being liked if I spoke out," she elaborated. "I realized that's this forced, societal feminist outlook of how women should be—they should feel sorry for speaking out."

As independent and outspoken as she is, Moretz is equally interested in being well-liked. 

"I want to be America's sweetheart," she says, matter-of-factly. "I want to be beloved. I want to be an indie queen, but I want people to really love me and what I've done and let me be a part of their lives at home."

She may need her voice to be heard, but Moretz certainly doesn't need anyone to pick up her check. 

"Don't take me to Nobu and get me nigiri. I'm ok. I can take myself to Nobu," she declared. "I don't need someone to take me to Nobu."