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Lost Moments We'll Never Forget


Just because Lost is over doesn't mean it's stopped generating mysteries.

The fan-favorite TV show wrapped in May 2010, but its series finale (which is loved around these parts) is puzzling fans once again: Viewers streaming the series on Netflix are getting a shorter version of the finale. Not just a minute or two, but 18 minutes have been cut from the series ender. Somehow this is all Jacob's fault.

So what gives? Damon Lindelof, Lost's showrunner, told E! News he wants to know too.

"I haven't watched the finale since it aired, but the fact that viewers bingeing Lost for the first time don't get to hear Miles' ‘duct tape' line, not to mention many, MANY other moments, makes me want to cry harder than Jack Shephard. And that guy can cry," Lindelof said in an exclusive statement to E! News. "I pray to Jacob (who I guess is actually Hurley now) that this obvious mistake gets corrected soon.  If it doesn't, I have no choice but to subject those responsible to watch the episode where Jack gets his tattoos and flies a kite with Bai Ling over and over again until they surrender."

Shudder Not that episode!

Lindelof told EW, who first pointed out the episode was trimmed, he doesn't think Netflix is at fault here. You see, "The End" that originally aired on ABC on May 23, 2010 is the Lost finale, but Lindelof said he recalls ABC had to edit the show into traditional format for reruns and other markets. He thinks this is the version that got sent to Netflix.

So, again, what gives?

Netflix is looking into it and has responded on Twitter, citing an "unintentional glitch" that is being fixed with the original unedited version of the finale. After the streaming giant's response, showrunner Carlton Cuse tweeted, "Thank you @netflix for promising to restore the version we made of the Lost finale to the service."

The real kicker would've been if the missing minutes had been 4, 8, 15, 16, 23 or 42. Somebody dropped the ball here. At least be thankful this didn't happen on "The Constant," because then there would sure be hell to pay.