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Lamar Odom

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Lamar Odom's road to recovery continues.

E! News has gotten an update on the former NBA star's health as he undergoes therapy at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles as he recovers after being found unconscious in a Las Vegas brothel in October, and unfortunately, we've learned that Odom is "struggling" as he tries to get himself back to good health.

"He has not spoken in the halls during his therapy," a source tells E! News. "It appears he can't walk on his own. He has a walker that he does short walks with the aid of therapists."

The insider adds, "He always is struggling. I saw the other day he got tired after a short session in the walker and had to be transferred back to his wheel chair."

Although Lamar is having difficulty, he hardly has to deal with it all alone.

Khloe Kardashian has been near Odom's side throughout this entire journey, and has visited the 36-year-old former NBA star frequently, even daily at times, since he was hospitalized a few months ago.

"I know these hospital halls way too well," Khloe said on Twitter. "Hoping from one room to another."

The Keeping Up With the Kardashians star opened up to Today's Natalie Morales in a pre-taped interview in November about Odom's health crisis and how the initial phone call was absolutely petrifying. Because they're still legally married, Khloe was responsible for making all medical decisions.

"It's a horrible call to get," she admitted. "Getting to the hospital and knowing he's in a coma and having to run these tests or make medical decisions. It's terrifying."

She explained that no matter what she did there was always going to be a risk, which scared her even more because she was responsible for his care. "You have to make risk-and-reward decisions," Khloe continued. "Like, OK, well, there's an 80 percent chance if we do this operation, he might pass away. But also if we don't do it, there's a 90 percent chance he'll pass away."

Khloe later added, "They think, like, within a year and a half to two years that, mentally, he might be fully recovered. But they don't know."

—Reporting by Sara Kitnick