Living in the Age of Airplanes, Harrison Ford

National Geographic Studios/Getty Images

A National Geographic documentary film about airplanes and the history of air travel, narrated by Harrison Ford, is coming to theaters in April, a month after the actor and longtime pilot survived a small plane crash.

The 72-year-old Star Wars and Indiana Jones actor had suffered moderate injuries after a World War II vintage plane he was piloting crashed on a golf course near Los Angeles soon after takeoff.

"This spring, National Geographic Studios presents an immersive new giant screen film experience that offers a fresh perspective on a modern-day miracle that many of us take for granted: flying," the studio said in a statement on Thursday. "Using spectacular aerial and nature photography, Living in the Age of Airplanes carries audiences across 200,000 years of history and around the globe on an epic journey to 95 locations in 18 countries spanning seven continents to remind us how, in a single century, aviation has changed our world forever."

"Narrated by actor and pilot Harrison Ford, Living in the Age of Airplanes will premiere in IMAX®, giant screen, 15/70mm dome screens and digital cinemas nationwide beginning April 10, 2015," it said. 

Living in the Age of Airplanes

National Geographic Studios

The documentary film was filmed in 2014 and features music by composter James Horner, known for his work on soundtracks of movies such as Titanic, Avatar, Willow, Honey, I Shrunk the Kids, Apollo 13 and The Mask of Zorro.

Living in the Age of Airplanes includes scenes such as...

A view of the horseshoe-shaped Grand Canyon skywalk, a steel and glass platform built 4,000 feet above ground and 70 feet away from the rim:

Living in the Age of Airplanes

National Geographic Studios

A breathtaking view of Iguazu Falls in Brazil, with vertical drops of up to 262 feet and surrounded by a subtropical rainforest:

Living in the Age of Airplanes

National Geographic Studios

A DC-3 taxiing in the show in Union Glacier, Antarctica:

 

Living in the Age of Airplanes

National Geographic Studios

Ford has flown small aircraft for years.

"I fly myself everywhere," Ford told National Geographic in 2008. "I like all kinds of flying, including practical flying for search and rescue."

He had also survived previous crashes. In 1999, he made an emergency landing of a helicopter during a training flight north of Los Angeles and emerged unscathed.

"Well, there was a mechanical failure while we were practicing power recovery autorotations," he told National Geographic. "It was more or less a hard landing. Luckily, I was with another aviation professional and neither of us was hurt—and both of us are still flying."

He was also unhurt in a 2000 crash of a six-passenger plane he had piloted. As he was landing in Nebraska, shifting wings had tossed the aircraft off of the runway, damaging its wings.

"He takes every flight he makes seriously and I would trust him with my own family as his passengers today and in the future, Steve Stafford, Ford's former flight instructor, told E! News, adding about the March crash, "The fact that he was able to 'dead stick' the plane back to a survivable landing is a lasting testament to his piloting abilities and his coolness under pressure."

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