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Prepare yourselves to be moved into utter silence.

The One Campaign, co-founded by U2's Bono, has released a chilling PSA about the growing Ebola crisis in West Africa starring celebrities such as Ben Affleck and Matt Damon.

Staring into the camera, the stars appear completely silent while the viewer waits for something to happen—nothing does. Everyone's silence results in powerful demonstration that reflects how devastating the epidemic's effects really are.

The PSA also includes Will Ferrell, Connie Britton, Ellie Goulding, Akon, Thandie Newton and Danai Gurira of The Walking Dead. Two Liberian health care workers also appear in the video, along with African musicians Fally Ipupa and Angelique Kidjo.

Morgan Freeman also appears in the video, as he once starred in 1995's Outbreak, which was based on a fictional virus similar to Ebola.

In addition the stars giving their silence, the PSA also comes with a petition to urge world leaders to act.

"Ebola is devastating parts of West Africa. And every day we continue to wait—for funding to reach the ground, for nurses and doctors to be deployed, for the shattered medical services to be rebuilt—more people die. Tell world leaders it's time to act," the organization writes on its page.

The One Campaign hopes to receive 250,000 signatures for its petition that hopes to "...tell world leaders it's time to stop the outbreak now AND build health systems that could stop crises like this from happening ever again."

Bono has been doing a lot for the fight against Ebola recently, as he is also part of Band Aid 30, a star-studded group that is responsible for the remake of the '80s hit "Do They Know It's Christmas?" that was recorded to raise money for the cause.  

Nearly 5,000 people have died from Ebola in Africa, which the organization claims is a result of leaders just talking about the epidemic. In the U.S., there have been four cases with one resulting in death. Two of the infections originated in the U.S., while one originated in Liberia and the other in Guinea, according to a report by the World Health Organization.

The first recorded case of Ebola occurred in 1976 in then-Zaire (now Democratic Republic of the Congo). The virus appeared in the U.S. in 1989 after monkeys imported from the Philippines were found to be infected with it.

In 2014, the Democratic Republic of the Congo reported its seventh outbreak of the virus. It is reportedly not related to the other outbreaks in other West African countries.