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Bill Cosby, Barbara Bowman

Ray Tamarra/FilmMagic

For almost 10 years now, Barbara Bowman has spoken out about allegedly being sexually assaulted by Bill Cosby when she was a teenager.

It's only now, after Hannibal Burress called the comedian a rapist in a comedy act last month, that her claims are being heard once more.

Cosby has denied the allegations, though Bowman opened up to the Washington Post about her alleged abuse and why she remained silent during the time that the incidents allegedly took place.

In 2004, after Andrea Constand filed a lawsuit against Cosby for sexual assault, Bowman said that she wanted to tell her story in court but was unable to.

"In the end, I didn't have the opportunity to do that, because Cosby settled the suit for an undisclosed amount of money," she told the paper.

Cosby has stated that sex with Constand was consensual.

In the same interview, Bowman recalled the first time that she felt taken advantage of by the TV star, saying, "Cosby won my trust as a 17-year-old aspiring actress in 1985, brainwashed me into viewing him as a father figure, and then assaulted me multiple times.

"In one case, I blacked out after having dinner and one glass of wine at his New York City brownstone…When I came to, I was in my panties and a man's T-shirt, and Cosby was looming over me. I'm certain now that he drugged and raped me. But as a teenager, I tried to convince myself I had imagined it."

Bowman also told the newspaper that several people in Cosby's camp were privy to what was going on behind closed doors.

She told the Post, "Talent agents, hotel staff, personal assistants and others who knowingly made arrangements for Cosby's criminal acts or overlooked them should be held equally accountable."

The paper made multiple attempts to reach out to Cosby and his camp for comment regarding the comments, but received no response.

But in the end, she says the hardest part about the new spotlight on Cosby's alleged behavior is that she didn't feel like she was taken seriously from the get-go.

"While I am grateful for the new attention to Cosby's crimes, I must ask my own questions: Why wasn't I believed? Why didn't I get the same reaction of shock and revulsion when I originally reported it? Why didn't our stories go viral?"

Cosby has given an interview to NPR's Scott Simon, which is currently scheduled to air tomorrow morning. Simon teased on Twitter that Cosby's "answer to those serious allegations is totally unexpected."

A rep for Cosby has not yet responded to our request for comment.