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Gary Glitter's judgment day is almost here.

The faded glam rocker on Thursday endured a one-day trial on charges he committed obscene acts on two underaged girls at his Vietnam home.

Per published reports, the hearing began with Glitter strutting into the courtroom, making the two-finger victory sign and professing his innocence.

The over-the-top popster, whose real name is Paul Francis Gadd, was questioned by prosecutors, as were the girls, ages 11 and 12, who were asked whether he molested them.

Glitter, 61, has repeatedly denied the allegations, saying he considered the girls "like his grandchildren" and was only teaching them English.

To keep the identities of the girls private, judicial officials closed the trial to the press and public. However, as the "Do You Wanna Touch" singer was being escorted out of the courtroom for lunch, he was met by reporters, who asked him whether his accusers were lying and whether he had pleaded innocent. The singer, wearing a black T-shirt and black cap, smiled and nodded yes to both queries.

The entertainer, best known for the made-for-basketball anthem "Rock and Roll Part 2," is accused of committing "lewd acts" on the girls, allegations that could net him anywhere from three to seven years in the slammer. It could've been worse. Had Glitter been charged with the more serious crime of child rape, he could have faced death by firing squad if convicted.

He was taken into custody Nov. 19 as he tried to board a plane bound for Bangkok after police announced he was wanted for questioning.

In 1999, Glitter served a two-month sentence in his native England and was placed on a child sex-offender list after pleading guilty to 54 counts of possessing kiddie porn. He later turned up in Cambodia, but was expelled from the country after child-welfare activists petitioned the government. He eventually settled in Vietnam.

A verdict in Glitter's abuse case is expected Friday.