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    "Survivor" Jenna Poses for "Playboy"

    The last time audiences got a glimpse of Jenna Morasca's, um, assets, the Survivor: Amazon winner was disrobing for some chocolate and peanut butter.

    At least this time she's being properly compensated.

    Playboy confirmed today that the 21-year-old swimsuit model has posed in the buff for their August issue. Payment, in peanut butter or otherwise, was not disclosed but it's estimated the jungle babe could earn up to $1 million for the pictorial.

    Also appearing in the feature, Jenna's bosom buddy and fellow freakin' evil stepsister Heidi Strobel, a phys-ed teacher from Missouri.

    The winsome twosome caught the attention of Playboy editors when they went topless and bottomless, albeit with parts blurred, in the sixth installment of CBS' Survivor. (Chunky first season veteran Richard Hatch also generated buzz by going native, but viewers weren't exactly clamoring for more of the Snake.)

    Another Survivor alum who's graced the pages of Playboy is The Australian Outback's Jerry Manthey, but Morasca is the first $1 million winner to pose for the magazine.

    Jenna wasted little time disrobing after winning the title of sole Survivor last month. She shot the Playboy pictorial at a Brooklyn studio the morning after she was crowned during a live telecast May 11.

    Playboy editors then went into overdrive, charged with the task of turning the sexy photo shoot into a glossy spread within 90 days. It's the fastest turnaround ever executed by the magazine.

    And it all happened with the blessing of CBS and Survivor executive producer Mark Burnett, who have the veto power to control contestants' media appearances for up to a year after the show airs.

    Just last month, CBS nixed plans for Jenna to appear in an anti-fur campaign for the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals citing "contractual obligations."

    The network has since relented, clearing the way for Jenna to don a fake fur bikini (think Raquel Welch in 1966's One Million Years B.C.).

    "We simply believed it was right thing to do," explained network spokesman Chris Ender. "Jenna wanted to participate, and PETA adjusted the ad to where the Survivor brand was not mentioned. Everybody was happy."

    Originally, CBS claimed to object to the group cashing in on Jenna's Survivor notoriety, including a slogan that read "Animals Need Fur to Survive--You Don?t."

    Sources had also pointed to the prior bad blood between the network and the animal rights group as the cause of the snafu.

    Pro-vegetarian PETA activists picketed the Eye network three years ago after the original group of would-be Gilligans munched on barbecued rats. Survivor drew even more protests from the animal rights group during the second season when tribe members clubbed chickens for breakfast and Michael Skupin carved up a slow-moving wild sow.

    But in an interview last month Ender denied that CBS has an axe to grind.

    "We harbor no grudge against PETA," said the spokesman at the time. "In some ways, we're grateful. They've provided us with some of the best publicity we ever had in the first season."

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