Now that the media has temporarily put on hold its obsession with celebritydom, the celebrities are taking their messages straight to the masses.

And what better way to reach out to fans (other than last Friday's America: A Tribute to Heroes telethon) than by posting their thoughts on the terror strikes on their official Websites?

Some, like the ultraliberal Barbra Streisand have put aside differences to pledge support to Dubya in the name of unity, while others, such as the the politically charged Rage Against the Machine, have questioned the government's impending strikes on Afghanistan.

"In light of recent events, I strongly believe we must support our government despite our disagreements on certain policies," Streisand writes in a message posted to barbrastreisand.com. "We have seen that when we set aside our differences for the greater good, we can prevail against any negative force in this world." (Babs, by the way, did the unthinkable and removed all her anti-Bush rants from her site.)

Meanwhile, in a message on www.ratm.com, Rage Against the Machine writes: "On Tuesday, the victims were American. But the horrible scenes that we've witnessed on TV...are regular occurrences in other places around the globe...We should stand together against this type of violence in all its forms, whenever it happens, whether its done in the name of religious fanaticism, or in the names of our own domestic elite."

Other musicians are dealing in different ways. On her site, Alanis Morissette released a free download of her song "Utopia" in "the spirit of wanting to offer comfort to everyone who is grieving."

"I believe this is a hugely defining time for us as human beings," says Morissette on alanismorissette.com. "I believe we live in a relative realm and that it is in the face of what some are calling 'evil' that we are able to know ourselves as peaceful, transcendent and willing to contemplate the motivations for doing what happened on September 11."

Aside from Morissette, an avid Yoga enthusiast and student of Eastern spirituality, another spiritual celeb, Shirley MacLaine, is trying to promote healing in her own way.

Since the catastrophe the actress, as famous for her books on reincarnation as for her memorable screen roles, made two previously members-only chakra meditation sessions available for free on her site, shirleymaclaine.com.

"Let's allow our souls to smile and remember that adversity introduces us to ourselves," MacLaine writes. And, as for our enemies, she suggests we "melt their weapons, melt their hearts, melt their anger with love."

Here's a quick rundown of other Web-based celeb reactions:

Cindy Crawford writes in a September 21 message: "Having just had a beautiful baby girl, I was filled with so many conflicting emotions. Joy at becoming a mother again and deep sorrow for the tragic loss of so many lives. I'm not sure either reality has set in. I am filled with overwhelming admiration for the heroism and bravery displayed by so many."

"My first response once it seeped into my brain that there was something that really had happened was that I wanted to be with my children," says Melissa Etheridge. "That was an overwhelming need at that point in time time of the crisis."

"Those of you who are strong need to be there for those who have lost someone today. We have to be here for each other right now," writes Tori Amos in a September 11 posting.

"I hope that we can do our best to be patient with one another and accommodate each other in our different forms of grieving and coping," Moby suggests in a message dated September 14.

"When I said that I think our nation is a bit arrogant, what I meant is that as a world superpower...I feel like we've taken on the attitude that we, as a country, are untouchable. How did we get that way? I wholeheartedly appreciate the freedom we have in the United States. I think this is a wake up call for us all to take notice that these freedoms are not a given," writes Backstreeter Kevin Richardson in response to controversial comments he made criticizing America's foreign policy.

"Our hearts and prayers go out to the injured and the families of those who perished," writes Steven Tyler on behalf of Aerosmith. "This country is all about freedom and we're proud to be an American band."

"P. Diddy and the entire Bad Boy family would like to thank all the rescue workers for their heroic efforts during the World Trade Center and Pentagon tragedy. Our thoughts and heartfelt prayers are with all those touched by this great tragedy," Sean "Puffy" Combs writes on his p-diddy.com. And, in a message to fans on bobhope.com, the legendary entertainer says he and wife Dolores share "share your concerns, your hurt and compassion."

"It is time to hug your neighbor and embrace your nation," says Hope, who has rallied generations of Americans in times of crisis. "God bless you! God bless our country!"