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If you can't get what you want from a company, buy it--or, in the case of the NAACP, a piece of it.

The civil-rights organization, livid about the lack of minority characters written into the new fall shows, just purchased 100 stock shares for each parent companies of the four major broadcaste networks, NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox.

Doing this will allow the organization to attend shareholder meetings and voice their diversity concerns.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the total purchase price came to $22,000, and the shares were issued under the name of NAACP president and CEO Kweisi Mfume, since the feds place restrictions on nonprofit organizations playing the stock market.

The buys come a little more than a week after Mfume himself assailed the networks for not featuring even one person of color in a leading role in any of their 26 new comedies and dramas.

It also comes just days after a widely published study reveals just how divided television's ethnic viewerscape is now.

Where 10 years ago, blacks and whites shared a favorite television program, The Cosby Show, we've apparently come to a time when the most popular series among African-Americans--the WB's Steve Harvey Show--ranks 127th among Caucasians.

According to that show's star, comedian Steve Harvey, his program's audience isn't the only thing that's different.

Speaking to the Philadelphia Inquirer Wednesday at the Television Critics Association annual tour in Pasadena, California, Harvey said, "If my show was No. 1 in any other demographic, I'd get to be on the sides of buses and billboards all over town. I'd get to be on the covers of magazines. But I get no parties, no balloons.

"I don't even get a basket of fruit sent to my trailer. Advertisers won't pay for African-Americans. They don't think we buy cars and detergent and homes. They think all we do is eat candy and drink soda."