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    Michael Jackson Manslaughter Trial: Conrad Murray's Treatment "Absolutely Incomprehensible"

    Conrad Murray Robyn Beck-Pool/Getty Images

    UPDATE 12:15 p.m.: Shafer briefly discussed his role in establishing propofol dosage guidelines and noted that if yuo start sedation too quickly, the patient will rapidly reach toxicity. "You need to have a little more mathematics in order to handle it." While this would ordinarily be the time that court takes its lunch recess, due to scheduling conflicts with Shafer, the final witness, court will not be in session this afternoon or tomorrow, and the trial has recessed until Monday morning.

    UPDATE 11:30 a.m.: Prosecution has called Shafer, its final witness, to the stand.

    UPDATE 10:50 a.m.: Kamangar talks about some of Jackson's symptoms and the importance of constant monitoring and assessments: "If you are bold enough to have the lack of judgment to use propofol in this setting, it is incumbent on you" to ensure any lasting effects are not from the sedative. Flanagan is arguing that the effects of propofol had likely worn off the morning of Jackson's death, and that his continued sleeping was a natural state.

    MORE: Check out yesterday's trial shockers

    UPDATE 10:25 a.m.: Kamangar testifies that, based on his medical history, Jackson likely suffered from insomnia and been treated for the condition by numerous doctors over the years. He also confirms that Jackson was receiving demerol shots from Dr. Arnold Klein, and that Murray should have been able to ascertain that based on Jackson's slurred speech and other physical manifestations. "In a home setting, it is absolutely incomprehensible and unacceptable" to use propofol, he added, further noting that to treat his insomnia and anxiety with lorazepam, as Murray did, would be like "a fire that is out of control, but just sprinkling water on it."

    UPDATE 9:20 a.m.: Murray's defender J. Michael Flanagan pressed Kamangar as to whether or not Murray's complete failure to document Michael's condition or make medical notes affected his treatment, asking if his lack of note-taking is really what killed Jackson. Kamangar said that it obviously couldn't have helped, and said documentation is not an afterthought but a necessity when treating patients and to not do so is yet another example of an extreme deviation from the standard of care.

    He did agree with Flanagan, however, that it was a mix of both propofol and lorazepam that ultimately killed Jackson.

    How do you top a bombshell day in court? Well, you can't, but you can bow out while you're ahead, which is exactly what the prosecution in the Michael Jackson involuntary manslaughter trial may try and do.

    Just two witnesses remain on their list for their case against Conrad Murray, and one of them, sleep expert and pulmonary critical care doc Nader Kamangar, will resume his testimony begun yesterday when court kicks off this morning. The prosecution's final witness is expected to be Dr. Steven Shafer, a researcher and professor and—here's the rub—an expert in propofol.

    As always, E! Online will be streaming all the courtroom action all day long, starting at 8:45 a.m. PT.

    (Originally published on Oct. 13, 2011 at 8:40 a.m. PT)

    —Additional reporting by Baker Machado

    PHOTOS: Michael Jackson Manslaughter Trial

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