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Michael Jackson

George Rose/Getty Images

Michael Jackson's latest court battle keeps getting weirder. And he hasn't even shown up yet.

Another day of testimony in the case—in which Sheik Abdulla bin Hamad Al-Khalifa maintains the singer reneged on a recording contract, among other money-making music ventures—yielded yet more good-natured remarks about both the superstar and the Bahraini royal, including claims they considered each other "brothers."

This time, the gushing came courtesy of Jackson's former personal assistant, who not only backed her boss' seemingly naïve belief that the sheik's $7 million-plus payout was nothing more than a gift, but also revealed the seemingly mind-boggling detail that the erstwhile King of Pop is not currently in possession of a bank account.

Suddenly Jackson's neverending financial problems make a little more sense.

Grace Rwaramba, who also served as nanny to Jackson's children, testified in London's High Court today that the sheik was "sweet" for giving Jackson money, gifts, and even a residence in his palace, and often referred to the singer as his "brother."

"He would say, 'What can I do for my brother?' 'What can I give the children?'" she said. "Mr. Jackson had a back pain and he told me to get Tiger Balm for him."

Among the financial handovers in contention are two lump payments of $35,000 and $1 million, both of which were intended for Jackson, but as he does not have an account, were deposited in Rwaramba's account by the sheik.

Rwaramba, who claims she was always under the impression the figures were not to be repaid, said she was "flabbergasted" when the deposits were made.

Al-Khalifa, she said, even apologized for what was, to his mind, a relatively paltry sum.

"He said next time it would be more."

In addition to the big deposits, Al-Khalifa also paid for hotel rooms and Toys 'R Us shopping sprees for Jackson's entourage and kids, respectively, and at one point even shelled out more than $300,000 to bankroll the singer's "motivational guru."

As Jackson was apparently not motivated enough to record a record's worth of music during his Bahrain stay, it seems it was money not so well spent.

Jackson himself is traveling to the U.K. this weekend and will take the stand in his own defense Monday afternoon.