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Little Women, 1994

Columbia Pictures

In our new favorite WTF news of the day, 2016 could see the premiere of the most interesting new series in quite a while.

E! News has confirmed that the CW has a script in development that is described as a "hyper-stylized, gritty adaptation" of Louisa May Alcott's literary classic, Little Women.

Yes, you heard that right. "Gritty" and "Little Women" were just used in the same sentence.  

But wait—it gets better!

The script, written by Alexis Jolly, follows "disparate half-sisters Jo, Meg, Beth, and Amy" as they "band together in order to survive the dystopic streets of Philadelphia and unravel a conspiracy that stretches far beyond anything they have ever imagined—all while trying not to kill each other in the process." 

How has no one thought of Little Women set in a dystopia before?! 

Even the executive producer is kind of a head-scratcher, since most people will know him better by the name of Tony DiNozzo from NCIS, aka Michael Weatherly

We've never been so surprisingly intrigued. We love gritty adaptations of things that were not originally gritty, but we're also very attached to the story of Little Women. On the other hand, it really is just a story of young women growing up, which could fit into any setting. It's just the killing-each-other part that has us a little worried. 

If you don't quite remember, Little Women follows the lives of the four March sisters as they grow up around the U.S. Civil War in the 1860s, dealing with dating, marriage, pregnancy, illness, and most other everday things that plagued young women in the 1800s. The original novel was published in two volumes in 1868 and 1869 and has been adapted into six different film adaptations. We're particularly big fans of the version from 1994, which starred Winona Ryder, Christian Bale, Kirsten Dunst, Claire Danes, and Susan Sarandon

As strange as this idea is at first, the CW has been truly killing it lately in the grit department—even if you're only talking about The 100—so this might actually work.