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Bill Cosby

Peter Kramer/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

This was an extra-bad weekend for Bill Cosby.

Excerpts of a 2005 deposition he gave in a civil suit brought against him by a woman who was accusing him of sexual assault, obtained by media outlets earlier this month, showed that he had admitted to obtaining Quaaludes to give to women he intended to have sex with, and that he had given a woman he did have sexual contact with Benadryl beforehand.

But then on Saturday The New York Times obtained and published the so-called highlights of a full copy of the deposition—and if his character wasn't already tarnished before, consider him cloaked in rust now.

"I think I'm a pretty decent reader of people and their emotions in these romantic sexual things, whatever you want to call them," Cosby is quoted in court documents, per the Times. When the attorney questioning him suggested that he was "making light of a very serious situation," he reportedly replied, "That may very well be."

Through his attorneys, Cosby has denied the decades-old allegations of sexual assault and attempted sexual assault that have surfaced over the past year. His lawyer has not yet returned a new request for comment.

According to the NYT, plaintiff Andrea Constand's attorney had asked the court this month to lift a confidentiality clause concerning the lawsuit so that the 1,000-plus-page deposition could be made public.

In the deposition, Cosby had talked about offering to pay Constand's college tuition if she maintained at least a 3.0 grade-point average, and in the full transcript, he's quoted as saying, "My wife would not know it was because Andrea and I had had sex and that Andrea was now very, very upset and that she decided that she would like to go to school."

Bill Cosby

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Constand was the one whom Cosby admitted giving Benadryl too, although, per NYT, her attorney said that the plaintiff thought she had been given a more powerful drug.

He would give Quaaludes to women "the same as a person would say have a drink," he said in the deposition, and asked if he thought another woman mentioned in the testimony had been lucid enough to consent to sex after taking a quaalude during an encounter in 1976, Cosby said, "I don't know."

The deposition news proved to be a tipping point for what this film producer described as the "last project standing behind him."

Footage of Cosby in the documentary Painted Down, about how white stuntmen used to wear blackface so they could double for black actors in Hollywood films, has been excised, according to producer Noni Robinson.

 "We will not use Cosby's footage in the film in light of the recent court deposition," Robinson said in a statement to E! News. Months ago when the allegations against Cosby were first re-surfacing, she had told Deadline that they would still use the footage, but told the site today, "Cosby is no longer attached to the project. We were the last project standing behind him, but now with Whoopi and CAA pulling the plug, we must also disassociate and cut all ties with Cosby. It's the right thing to do in light of the recent court deposition being made public."

Whoopi Goldberg who for months cautioned against automatically assuming Cosby's guilt, expressed her frustration on The View last week about the statute of limitation that applies to rape cases in the U.S.

"If this is to be tried in the court of public opinion, I got to say all of the information that's out there kind of points to guilt," she said.

Meanwhile, Creative Artists Agency and Cosby parted ways late last year.

—Additional reporting by Baker Machado