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Chipotle

Chipotle

We remember the announcement like it was yesterday. The New York Times published the actual calorie counts of average lunches at Chipotle, and the results were enough to send us into a burrito-fueled downward spiral. (In case you'd like a not-so-friendly reminder, the typical order racks up over 1,000 calories.) 

The news was devastating, sure, but not quite devastating enough to keep us from our beloved burrito bowls. Instead we've just been feeling all kinds of guilty during every Chipotle meal—and we've also been pretty annoyed with the Times for ruining all the fun.

But now, the paper (and the restaurant) have kind of redeemed themselves.

The Times published today that Chipotle will no longer serve genetically altered food. Back in 2013 the chain started labeling which ingredients contained the dreaded GMOs, but starting today they're completely banned from the supply chain.

Founder Steve Ells hopes that other restaurants will follow suit, telling the paper "This is another step toward the visions we have of changing the way people think about and eat fast food. Just because food is served fast doesn't mean it has to be made with cheap raw ingredients, highly processed with preservatives and fillers and stabilizers and artificial colors and flavors."

So, what does this mean for you (and your stomach)? There won't be much of a change in the food's taste, unless your palette is savvy enough to detect something like sunflower oil replacing regular oil in the making of chips and tortillas. Your body will thank you, though, for significantly less exposure to harmful ingredients. Everybody wins!