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Budweiser, Clydesdales

Anheuser-Busch, Facebook

This holiday season, Budweiser's commercials may start to look very different, for worse or for better. If you're a young person looking for some house-music-driven commercials, you may be in luck.

Over the past quarter-century, Budweiser's sales have been steadily declining. In 1988, the brand sold nearly 50 million barrels. Last year? The company sold just 16 million. After reigning king as the most popular beer—taking over the number one spot in 2001, it has been inched out by its sister beer Bud Light and competitor Coors Light. 

Today, approximately 44% of people ages 21 to 27 have never once tried Budweiser, according to Anheuser-Busch InBev NV. For that reason, Budweiser has decided enough is enough and is marketing their beer towards younger crowds, hoping to slow or stop its decline altogether.

New commercials will seek to target that 21- to 27-year-old market and convince them to step away from the craft beer and head back to a classic that used to be just one of four beers on tap a decade ago. Some bars don't even offer Bud on tap anymore, something Anheuser-Busch is determined to change.

Budweiser, Clydesdales

Anheuser-Busch, Facebook

But not to worry, the Clydesdales may not be completely lost… Just supplemented with some new, cool ads featuring people in their 20s. In a statement given to E! News, Anheuser-Busch said, "the Budweiser Clydesdales will, in fact, be featured in next year's Super Bowl advertising and are also a part of upcoming holiday responsible drinking advertising."

"The Clydesdales play a strong role for the brand, representing Budweiser quality and care for more than 80 years. As icons of the brand – and relevant symbols of integrity, perfection and team spirit for all generations – they are important to the brand and our campaigns," Anheuser-Busch continued.

We don't know about you, but we definitely hope Anheuser-Busch sticks to their word and keep the horses around… Maybe just adding to their arsenal of commercials.

"If you try to be too young and too hip, you lose your base," said Tony Ponturo, a former Anheuser-Busch senior marketing executive. "They'll say, 'That's not my Budweiser anymore.' You have to start with a message that resounds with a new generation of people but doesn't throw off the core drinker."

Cheers to hoping Budweiser's new commercials tug on our heartstrings just as much as that one with the puppy and the horse: