UPDATE: Dr. Luke's lawyer has released a statement following Kesha's latest interview. 

"The New York Times Magazine profile piece that ran today unfortunately has many inaccuracies," the statement partially read. "This article is part of a continuing coordinated press campaign by Kesha to mislead the public, mischaracterize what has transpired over the last two years, and gain unwarranted sympathy."

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Kesha is doing everything in her power to get new music in the ears of her loyal fans. 

In a tell-all interview, her first since filing sexual assault allegations against music producer Dr. Luke, with The New York Times Magazinethe pop sensation reveals new insight into the ongoing legal saga and how her new sound will reflect the personal turmoil she's faced for nearly four years.

Over the summer, Kesha says she submitted 22 previously unheard songs to Sony in hopes of expediting her otherwise standstill professional career. (Despite being allowed to perform at select events, Kesha has remained bound to Dr. Luke's Kemosabe label and has yet to release new music while the case continues). 

The Times describes four of Kesha's new songs, which she wrote and recorded on her own dime, titled "Hunt You Down," "Learn to Let It Go," "Rosé" and "Rainbow," a ballad she wrote during her two-month rehab stint in 2014. 

Kesha, 2016 BIllboard Music Awards, show

Kevin Winter/Getty Images

"Rainbow," produced by singer-songwriter Ben Folds, is "big and sweeping" and recalls a "Beach Boys vibe," while "Hunt You Down" dabbles as a "real country song with banjo and some real country sentiments." As for "Learn to Let it Go," the Times writes that it "sounded like something you'd hear in heavy rotation on radio with Kesha's beautiful, low voice singing that a happy ending is up to you," and "Rosé" is about a former flame that's since married. 

As for the lyrics to "Rainbow," she reportedly sings, "I found a rainbow, rainbow, baby. Trust me, I know life is scary, but just put those colors on, girl, and come and paint the world with me tonight." 

Recalling her musical evolution, Kesha tells the magazine, "To this day, I've never released a single that's a true ballad, and I feel like those are the songs that balance out the perception of you, because you can be a fun girl."

"You can go and have a crazy night out, but you also, as a human being, have vulnerable emotions. You have love," the 29-year-old adds.

Just prior to filing her lawsuit against Dr. Luke in 2014, Kesha dropped the signature dollar sign moniker from her name, a move she admits was a symbol of "taking back my strength, and I was taking back my voice, and taking back my power, taking back my body. I'm just taking back my f--king life."

And Kesha will continue her fight for musical sovereignty. Despite Sony Music insisting they've, "made it possible for Kesha to record without any connection, involvement or interaction with Luke whatsoever," Kesha's camp maintains otherwise. 

In a statement to the Times, a representative for the singer claims, "Dr. Luke has insisted Sony's participation is just an ‘accommodation' and has not denied that all decisions regarding the album are still being made by Dr. Luke."

Kesha has since spoken out about her most recent sit-down, taking to Instagram with a lengthy statement about the article. 

"thank you to the New York Times for shedding light on my life and legal situation," she wrote Wednesday morning. "there's nothing harder than dreaming and working and fighting for something your whole entire life, since you were 3 years old, since you could speak. and you FINALLY achieve it. and then have someone else take it away from you."

She continued, "my heart has a giant hole in it and is literally aching and throbbing from sadness and loss. imagine someone owning your voice... and not letting you sing. singing is how I have dealt with everything in my life. and my right has been taken away."

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