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Joe Jonas wants to talk about sex, baby—and boy, does he have a lot to say.

For years, he was forbidden from addressing the topic, whether it be through his music or in interviews. "Hollywood Records, who were under Disney, working a lot with Disney Channel and obviously just the age we were, we had to be careful with the certain things we wrote and said," he tells Notion magazine of the Jonas Brothers' musical beginnings. "We couldn't be too sexual or romantic in certain ways. And that's tough, because at the same time you're growing up and you want to write about these experiences you're having as a young adult."

Joe Jonas, Notion

Pantelis/Notion

The pressure for the pop trio to present a perfect image during that era was immense. "We were working with Disney in 2007 when the Vanessa Hudgens nude photo scandal happened. We'd hear execs talking about it, and they would tell us that they were so proud of us for not making the same mistakes, which made us feel like we couldn't ever mess up," the Camp Rock star says. "We didn't want to disappoint anyone—our parents, our fans, our employers—so we put incredible pressure on ourselves, the kind of pressure that no teenager should be under."

Today, the "Body Moves" singer is free of those constraints.

Joe Jonas, Notion

Pantelis/Notion

Being in DNCE has allowed Joe to explore a more mature side of himself, in a more artistic fashion. "I was younger, a lot younger, when I did the Jonas Brothers. Now being older, there's new experiences that I get to have, or just as an adult, like touring and travelling. You go out for a few drinks after the show. That's just so different already than what I am used to—getting on the tour bus and going to bed or watching a movie," the "Cake by the Ocean" singer says. "It was all exciting and good but these experiences now, on my own, on the road, its really great."

Joe, who gets wet 'n' wild for Notion 74's "School Spirit" issue, has always been curious about sex. Though he remained a virgin until age 20 (like his brothers, he'd worn a purity ring), Joe was an avid consumer of porn. "I would use my address to log into the websites, and I did this for seven days straight," the singer says. "A month later—and by the way, my dad was a pastor at the time—for a week or two straight there was a postcard with a naked woman on it saying 'Come join us again Joe' or 'We really miss you' or 'You naughty boy. Come visit us again.'"

Not exactly Hollywood Records material.

Joe has mixed feelings about the persona he perpetuated. "I wouldn't wish it upon anybody, [but] it molded me to where I am today. At the same time, it's tough to say that it's a bad thing because I feel pretty open, and there's not much I won't talk about [now], you know? There is a lot of obsession over secrecy in this day and age, and you're a kid living in a grown up's world," the singer says. "I definitely feel for a lot of young artists going through a lot of similar things."

Evolving in the public eye if often a delicate process. "It's this weird balance that artists have to go through," Joe tells Notion, "finding out how to be mature and not throw it in people's faces."

Notion 74 is on newsstands now.