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Chris Pratt, Women's Health

Women's Health

Fresh off the success of Jurassic World, which involves a bit of talk about genetics, hybrids and other science-like topics, Chris Pratt is getting research-like in his idea of romance in the July/August issue of Women's Health.

Although he and wife Anna Faris are eerily similar in their passions and personalities (#neverforget their bug collection), Pratt believes that opposites can and do attract...sometimes.

"Well, scientifically it's a fact, because you can look at the polarity of the water molecule and the capillary action of ice and water," he explains to the mag, laughing. "It can be true in real life, too, but I don't think it's a rule."

He and Faris are living examples of being exceptions to the questionable rule, as he tells the magazine that they couldn't be more alike. If you're like Anna and myself, we're very similar. We married ourselves because we have comparable egos and abnormally high self-esteem," he jokes.

What a sense of humor!

But on a more serious note, Pratt has some pretty high ethical standards when it comes to relationships. Although he is vehemently opposed to people lying to their partners, he does believe it gets complicated when feelings become involved.

"Honesty is the best policy, but being mindful of someone's feelings is also very important," he says. "It's not okay to lie, but it is okay to protect your partner. And understanding the difference requires wisdom."

We'll take some of that wisdom, Chris.

Even though he and his wife are very much in love, both practice privacy when it comes to expressing their feelings for each other in public. He's a fan of PDA, but prefers to keep it to a "classy" minimum.

"Keep it classy. Don't be gross," he implores. "I don't mind PDA; I do mind GPDA, which is Gross Public Displays of Affection."

He might have played a superhero in Guardians of the Galaxy, but the actor admits that he still gets scared, especially when it comes to son Jack Pratt.

"Parenting comes with a lot of fears—some rational, some irrational," he explains. "Jack...has had a couple of surgeries. Those were scary. He just had one recently, and I knew he would be fine because it was a minor thing and he's had it done before, but you can't help but get scared when your kid is going under anesthesia."