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O.J. Simpson

AP Photo/Myung Chun

It turns out that the tan suit O.J. Simpson was wearing when acquitted of murder has not reached national treasure status.

The Smithsonian Institution has unequivocally rejected an attempt by a former Simpson agent to donate the duds to their archive, which includes awesome artifacts like Dorothy's ruby slippers, the Hope diamond, John Dillinger's gun and other items that have played significant roles in U.S. culture.

"The Smithsonian's National Museum of American History will not be collecting O.J. Simpson's suit," read a brief statement on the museum website. "The decision was made by the museum's curators together with the director."

Apparently, the decision was made just hours after Smithsonian officials learned about the attempt to turn water into wine.

"We feel that this suit does not have a direct enough connection to represent the story of this event," museum spokeswoman Valeska Hilbig told the Washington Post's Reliable Source blog.

"This is no comment on the trial, O.J. Simpson, or the acquittal."

She said she didn't know whether any other O.J. memorabilia would ever be considered, but that they just didn't think the suit "was a good fit."

Hence, the Smithsonian has acquitted itself of any involvement with the NFL superstar turned pariah.

The rejection is a bit of a blow to the family of murder victim Ronald Goldman, which has been fighting for its share of a $33.3 million wrongful-death judgment against Simpson for more than 10 years.

Goldman, who wanted the suit as part of their payout, and Simpson agent Mike Gilbert, who's been hanging onto O.J.'s suit, shirt and tie from that fateful day (probably also hoping for a payout), agreed at a recent settlement hearing to donate the outfit to the Smithsonian or other museum.

Simpson, who's serving a 9-to-33-year prison sentence in Nevada for armed robbery, also agreed to the donation, so long as "there's no profit for anybody."

Other candidates willing to accept the suit, per the Post, include D.C.'s National Museum of Crime & Punishment, which recently exhibited serial killer Ted Bundy's Volkswagen bug.

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Let's see, what can we collect that's less creepy? How about Twilight Saga Stuff?!